RenRib_Feb17_Leaderboard

Facebook Twitter Sew4Home RSS Feed Follow Me on Pinterest Instagram

Sew4Home

Hand-Tied Patchwork & Sherpa Throw in Artisan by Kaffe Fassett

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

If you’re looking for bold color and design, you’d be hard-pressed to find anything more dramatic than the fabrics by Kaffe Fassett. His latest collection for FreeSpirit Fabrics is Artisan, and it more than lives up to his colorful reputation. Artisan is an eclectic mixture that borrows from the traditional stripes of hand-woven Indian textiles as well as the mod splashes of abstract art we associate with sixties-era fashion. Kaffe is a master at blending and understands that opposites can indeed attract. He’s combined an explosion of pattern into a cohesive collection that includes painterly prints, ikat, batik, and more. We’ve used it for a bohemian throw with a patchwork front that is bound and backed in super soft sherpa-style fleece. 

One of the hallmarks of the Kaffe collections is the size of many of his motifs. He doesn’t shy away from big and beautiful. To take advantage of this, our pieces are quite large and each is precisely fussy cut to best showcase the graphics.  

Artisan has two colorways. The cool and sophisticated Blue colorway, with its highlights of brown and green, was inspired by a scarf Kaffe discovered in an Egyptian marketplace.

The Sunny colorway, our choice for this project, explodes with the vibrancy of exotic fruit. The base yellows and oranges are playfully combined with an effervescent pink and rich turquoise.

Our thanks to our friends at FreeSpirit Fabrics for inviting us to be a part of the roll-out of this beautiful new collection. It brought a welcome blast of color into the gray days of fall and winter. 

We found a lovely selection of Artisan, including all the cuts we used, at Fabric DepotFat Quarter Shop and Fabric.com.

The eye-catching stitches in contrasting thread that run along the throw’s sashing go through just the top and batting layers. To maintain the curly nap of the sherpa-style fleece, the final quilting of the back to the top is hand-tied with floss. 

For hints and tricks about working with plush fabric, you can check out our Sewing with Plush Fabric tutorial. It's not a difficult fabric to sew with, but to create the best results, it helps to know the best practices to follow.

Our throw combines traditional quilting with the more standard layered-and-turned construction of a blanket. Although the piecing done here is quite basic, if you are brand new to patchwork, we have a five-part Quilting Basics Series you can review.

Our Artisan throw finishes at approximately 52” wide x 64” high.

Sewing Tools You Need

Fabric and Other Supplies

NOTE: Fabric amounts are shown for our Artisan fabric selections with enough specified to allow selective fussy-cutting of the bold motifs. Refer to the layout guide in the Getting Started section below. 

  • 2 yards of 44”+ wide quilting weight cotton for the A Blocks; we used Layered Stripe in Orange from the Artisan collection by Kaffe Fassett for FreeSpirit Fabrics
  • ⅝ yard of 44”+ wide quilting weight cotton for the B Block; we used Embroidered Flower Border in Orange from the Artisan collection by Kaffe Fassett for FreeSpirit Fabrics 
  • ⅝ yard of 44”+ wide quilting weight cotton for the C Blocks; we used Ikat Stripe in Yellow from the Artisan collection by Kaffe Fassett for FreeSpirit Fabrics
  • ⅝ yard of 44”+ wide quilting weight cotton for the D Blocks; we used Raked in Pumpkin from the Artisan collection by Kaffe Fassett for FreeSpirit Fabrics
  • ½ yard of 44”+ wide quilting weight cotton for the E Blocks; we used Gerbera in Sunshine from the Artisan collection by Kaffe Fassett for FreeSpirit Fabrics
  • ½ yard of 44”+ wide quilting weight cotton the sashing; we used Designer Solid Broadcloth in Cream by FreeSpirit Fabrics
  • 2¼ yards of 58"+ wide Sherpa Cuddle fleece or similar in a coordinating solid; we used Sherpa Cuddle in Ivory by Shannon Fabrics
  • 2 yards of 60”+ wide low loft batting
  • All-purpose thread to match fabric for piecing; we used ivory
  • All-purpose thread in a contrasting color for quilting stitches through the sashing; we used a quilter’s weight cotton thread in orange
  • ONE skein of heavy weight floss in a color to match sashing; we used ivory floss
  • Fabric pen or pencil
  • Seam gauge
  • Seam ripper
  • Scissors or rotary cutter and mat
  • Iron and ironing board
  • Straight pins 
  • Two hand sewing needles; large eye for thread floss and standard for closing the opening used for turning
  • Large safety pins for quilt basting or quilting spray adhesive; optional

Getting Started

NOTE: The illustrations above show our selection and placement pattern. To achieve this look, precise fussy cutting and placement of the directional prints is important. 

  1. Fabric A: Layered Stripe in Orange
    Cut TWO 19½” x 19½” squares
    Cut THREE 5½” high x width of fabric (WOF) strips, cut ONE strip in half and sew a half-length to the end of each of the other two strips, then cut each
    of these sewn lengths down to 49½”, giving you TWO 5½” x 49½” strips for the top and bottom of the patchwork
  2. Fabric B: Embroidered Flower Border in Orange
    Cut ONE 19½” x 19½” square
  3. Fabric C: Ikat Stripe on Yellow
    Cut THREE 9½” x 19½” rectangles; see diagram above for stripe direction
  4. Fabric D: Raked in Pumpkin
    Cut ONE 9½” x 19½” rectangle
    Cut TWO 9½” x 9½” squares
  5. Fabric E: Gerbera in Sunshine
    Cut THREE 9½” x 9½” squares
  6. From the fabric for the sashing
    Cut NINE 1½” x WOF strips, then sub-cut these strips as follows:
    THREE at 1½” x 9½”
    EIGHT at 1½” x 19½”
    TWO at 1½” x 29½”
    THREE at 1½” x 30”
  7. From the Sherpa Cuddle for back as well as the strips for the top, bottom, and sides
    Cut ONE 52½” wide  x 64½” high piece for the main back panel
    Cut TWO strips for the sides running lengthwise next to the main back panel: 2” wide x 64½” high
    CUT TWO strips for the top and bottom running width of fabric: 52½” wide x 2” high
    NOTE: At 60” wide and 2¼ yards in length, you have the choice to cut the side strips as described above or to cut all the strips WOF and then piece lengths to create the longer side strips. Some people prefer working with all WOF strips in order to avoid any possible issues with stretching. Personal choice.
  8. Leave the batting as one piece. It will be layered and cut within the steps below. 

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

NOTE: Refer to the diagram above to follow along as each of the four main sections are created: upper left, upper right, lower left, and lower right. We will be referring to the pieces by their Kaffe Fassett Artisan collection names and corresponding letter designations throughout. 

All seam allowances are ¼”, and all are pressed toward the sashing strips. We used a Quarter Inch Seam foot for all piecing.

Upper Left Section

  1. Collect the pieces that make up the upper left section: one Fabric B 19½” x 19½” square, one Fabric C 9½” x 19½” rectangle, one Fabric D 9½” x 9½” square, two Fabric E 9½” x 9½” squares, one 1½” x 19½” sashing strip, two 1½” x 29½” sashing strips, and two 1½” x 9½” sashing strips.
  2. Pin the 1½” x 19½” sashing strip to the right hand side of the Fabric B 19½” x 19½” square. Stitch in place.
  3. Pin the Fabric C 9½” x 19½” rectangle to the remaining raw edge of the sashing strip. Stitch in place.

    NOTE: As noted above, all seam allowances are ¼” and all seams are pressed toward the sashing. 
  4. Pin the 1½” x 29½” sashing strip horizontally along the bottom of the B/C sewn panel. Stitch in place. Set aside.
  5. With the three 9½” squares and the two 9½” sashing strips, pin and stitch together in the following order: Fabric E square, sashing strip, Fabric D square, sashing strip, Fabric E Square.
  6. As with all, press the seams toward the sashing. 
  7. Pin the completed bottom row (E/D/E) to the bottom free edge of the sashing for the completed top row (B/C). Stitch in place. 
  8. Pin the remaining 1½” x 29½” sashing strip to the right hand side of the assembled block. Stitch in place.
  9. Set aside the upper left section. 

Upper Right Section

  1. Collect the pieces that make up the upper right section: one Fabric A 19½” x 19½” square, one Fabric D 9½” x 19½” rectangle, and one 1½” x 19½” sashing strip.
  2. Pin the 1½” x 19½” sashing strip to the bottom of the Fabric D 9½” x 19½” rectangle. Stitch in place.
  3. Pin the Fabric A 19½” x 19½” square to the remaining raw edge of the sashing strip. Stitch in place. 

Assemble Upper Left to Upper Right

  1. Collect the two upper sections. 
  2. Pin right sides together along the inner raw edges: the right raw edge of the upper left section’s sashing to the left raw edge of the upper right section. Stitch together to complete the full top section of the throw. 
  3. Collect two 1½” x 19½” sashing strips and two 1½” x 30” sashing strips. Break into two pairs of one 19½” strip and one 30" strip. Pin and stitch these two lengths together. Press open the seam allowance.
  4. Pin one long sashing strip to the bottom edge of the completed full top section and one to the top edge of the completed full top section. Stitch in place. 
  5. Set aside the completed full top section. 

Lower Left Section

  1. Collect the pieces that make up the lower left section: one Fabric A 19½” x 19½” square, one Fabric C 9½” x 19½” rectangle, and two 1½” x 19½” sashing strips.
  2. Pin the 1½” x 19½” sashing strip to the right hand side of the Fabric C 9½” x 19½” rectangle. Stitch in place.
  3. Pin the Fabric A 19½” x 19½” square to the remaining raw edge of the sashing strip. Stitch in place.
  4. Pin the remaining 1½” x 19½” sashing strip to the remaining raw edge of the Fabric A 19½” x 19½” square. Stitch in place.
  5. Set aside the completed lower left section. 

Lower Right Section

  1. Collect the pieces that make up the lower right section: one Fabric C 9½” x 19½” rectangle, one Fabric D 9½” x 9½” square, one Fabric E 9½” x 9½” square, one 1½” x 19½” sashing strip, and one 1½” x 9½” sashing strip.
  2. Pin the 1½” x 19½” sashing strip to the bottom of the Fabric C 9½” x 19½” rectangle. Stitch in place.
  3. Similar to the upper left section, pin together the two 9½” x 9½” squares with a 1½” x 9½” sashing strip in between: D/sashing/E.
  4. Pin the completed bottom row (D/E) to the bottom free edge of the Fabric C sashing. Stitch in place.

Assemble Lower Left to Lower Right

  1. Collect the two lower sections. 
  2. Pin right sides together along the inner raw edges: the right raw edge of the lower left section’s sashing to the left raw edge of the lower right section. Stitch together to complete the full lower section of the throw. 
  3. Similarly to what you did with the top section, collect one 1½” x 19½” sashing strip and one 1½” x 30” sashing strip. Pin and stitch these two lengths together. Press open the seam allowance.
  4. Pin this new long sashing strip to the bottom edge of the completed full bottom section. Stitch in place. 

Assemble completed top section to completed bottom section

  1. Pin the top and bottom sections right sides together along the inner raw edges: the bottom raw edge of the top section’s sashing to the upper raw edge of the bottom section. Stitch together to complete the main center section of the throw.

Add the final top and bottom border strips

  1. Find the two Fabric A 5½” x 49½” top and bottom strips, which you pieced and trimmed to length above.
  2. Pin one to the top of the assembled center section and one to the bottom of the assembled center section. In both cases, you are pinning to the remaining raw edge of the sashing. Stitch in place.
  3. Press the completed top from both the front and the back, making sure all the seam allowances are pressed towards the sashing on the back. 

Layer and quilt top to batting

  1. Place the batting flat on your work surface. Most people simply use the floor for this step; just make sure it's clean.
  2. Place the completed top right side up on the batting. Make sure the top is centered on the batting. There should be plenty of excess batting around all four sides.
  3. Pin or baste the layers. Many quilters use large safety pins to baste their quilts. Another option is to thread baste with needle and thread. And a third option is to use a temporary basting spray. The option chosen for this throw was to simply pin baste through the two layers. On this project, it is most critical to keep the layers flat along the sashing.
  4. Re-thread the machine with the contrasting quilting thread in the top and bobbin. 
  5. Set up your machine with a Walking foot or similar and lengthen the stitch.
  6. Topstitch along each side of every sashing strip. 
  7. Stop and lock the seam at the intersections; do not cross the topstitching. If your machine has a lock stitch function, this makes the neatest finish. If you do not have this feature, leave your thread tails long, then pull them through and knot to secure at the back. 
  8. When all the topstitching is complete, you still have that excess batting.
  9. Trim the batting flush with the top on all four sides. 

Add sherpa strips and backing and tie to finish

  1. Pin the 2” x 64½” sherpa strips right sides together along each side of the throw. Stitch in place, still using a ¼” seam allowance.
  2. Pin the 2” x 52½” sherpa strips right sides together along the top and the bottom of the throw. Stitch in place.
  3. Place the 52½” x 64½” sherpa backing panel right side up on your flat work surface (probably still that nice, clean floor).
  4. Place the throw top, with all four sherpa trim strips stitched in place, right side down on top of the backing. Make sure all four sides are flush. 
  5. Pin in place around all four sides, leaving an approximate 10” opening along one side for turning. 
  6. Using a ¼” seam allowance, stitch around all four sides, pivoting at the corners and locking your seam at either side of the 10” opening. 
  7. Clip the corners and turn right side out through the opening. Reach in through the opening to gently push out each corner so it is as sharp as possible. Press flat from the top; avoid pressing the sherpa
  8. Hand stitch the opening closed with tiny stitches, which will hide nicely within the nap of the sherpa.
  9. Thread the larger needle with a full strand of embroidery floss. Do not knot the end.
  10. Thread the floss through all the layers at each intersection, inserting from the front (leaving a tail), through to the back, and then returning again to the front. Trim to an overall length of approximately 2”. 
  11. Tie the tails into a double knot. The knot should be snug against the surface of the fabric.
  12. Repeat at each intersection. 
  13. Use a lint roller to remove the fluff left behind from the sherpa. 

Contributors

Project Design: Alicia Thommas
Sample Creation and Instructional Outline: Debbie Guild 

Tags: 

Section: 

Comments (4)

Sandee K said:
Sandee K's picture

So, by just topstitching tthrough the batting at the dashing side, this was enough to secure the quilt?  Would you need to tie on the main body as well?

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Sandee - As mentioned above, we did tie at each intersection of the sashing - so yes, across the quilt. If you click to enlarge some of the beauty shots in the introduction, you can see there are quite a few ties.

mpistey said:
mpistey's picture

I love the use of such dramatic fabric in a basically simple blanket. Just beautiful!

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@mpistey- Thanks! It was a beautiful collection to work with! 

Add new comment

*Sew4Home reserves the right to restrict comments that don’t relate to the article, contain profanity, personal attacks or promote personal or other business.
By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.