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Lush & Plush Trends from Fabric.com: Tuxedo Pillowcases in Flannel

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What does GQ suggest for the best-dressed bed linens this season? Formal flannel of course! Welcome to our newest S4H Series: we're diving into the lush-est, plushest, most trendy fabrics for Fall and Winter. Sponsored by the friendly folks at Fabric.com, we have a range of projects, tips and product reviews to get you working like a pro with flannel, Minky, faux fur and faux leather. Today, we have the perfect gift for the guy on your list: our 'well-suited' pillowcases in Tailor Flannels by Timeless Treasures from Fabric.com. They're stylish yet soft, and are such a clever way to wake up the snappy dresser in your life.

Fabric.com has a wonderful selection of Tailor Flannel by Timeless Treasures. Follow our suggestions listed below or put together your own wardrobe. We always recommend pre-washing your fabric prior to starting any project, but when working with flannel it is particularly important. Flannel will shrink, sometimes quite a bit. It also sheds a lot during laundering, so wash it separately. Make sure to also pre-wash the fabric you use for the tuxedo placket. And, since the completed pillowcases themselves will be laundered often, we recommend finishing all the seams with your sewing machine, or with a serger if you have one.

Our thanks to Fabric.com for helping us bring this Series to you. If you've never visited their site, you're missing out! Their selection is endless: from the latest designer quilting cottons to heavy canvas, sheer organza to cushy fleece... and just about everything in between. They also carry thread, notions, patterns, machines and more. They've been a delight to work with, and have put together a super Great Giveaway package to round out the Series - be watching for that!

Sewing Tools You Need

  • Any Sewing Machine (we recommend the Janome Hello Kitty 15822... you HAVE to check out this new machine; it is cute-squared)

Fabric and Other Supplies

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Amounts shown below on for ONE pillowcase.

Getting Started

  1. From the fabric for the body of the pillowcase cut TWO 21" x 27" pieces.
  2. From the fabric for the pillowcase trim cut ONE 9" x 41" piece.
  3. From the fabric for the flange accent cut TWO strips 2" x 21".
  4. From the tuxedo shirt fabric cut ONE 9" x 16" strip.

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

Create the tuxedo placket

  1. Find the 9" x 16" strip of "shirt" fabric. Place it right side down on your work surface. Measure in 4" from the right raw edge. Place a pin or make a mark with your fabric pen at this point at both the top and bottom of the strip.
  2. Fold the strip to the right at this point (in other words, you are folding the 12" end over the 4" end at the fold point. Press well.
    NOTE: In the photos below, we substituted a plain white woven fabric to best show the folding.
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  3. Measure from the fold to the right 1". Place a pin or make a mark with your fabric pen at this point at both the top and bottom of the strip.
  4. Fold the strip to the left at this marked point, creating a "Z" fold. Press well.
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  5. With the long end of the strip still extending to the left, measure from the edge of the fold you just made to the left ½". Place a pin or make a mark with your fabric pen at this point at both the top and bottom of the strip.
  6. Fold the strip to the right at this marked point. Press well.
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  7. With the long end of the strip now extending to the right, measure from the edge of the fold you just made to the right 1". Place a pin or make a mark with your fabric pen at this point at both the top and bottom of the strip.
  8. Fold the strip to the left at this marked point. Press well.
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  9. With the long end of the strip now extending to the left, measure from the edge of the fold you just made to the left ½". Place a pin or make a mark with your fabric pen at this point at both the top and bottom of the strip.
  10. Fold the strip to the right at this marked point. Press well. You should now have three little pleats, each ½".
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  11. Flip the half-pleated strip over, and open out the original 4" fold so it is out of the way and you can pleat the other side.
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  12. Lift up the inner rightmost pleat so you can see its crease line. Measure from this crease line 2" to the left and place a pin or make a mark with your fabric pen at this point at both the top and bottom of the strip.
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  13. Fold the strip over to the right at this marked point. Press well.
  14. With the long end of the strip now extending to the right, measure from the edge of the fold you just made to the right ½". Place a pin or make a mark with your fabric pen at this point at both the top and bottom of the strip.
  15. Fold the strip back to the left at this marked point. Press well.
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  16. With the long-ish (it is getting shorter!) end of the strip now extending to the left, measure from the edge of the fold you just made to the left 1". Place a pin or make a mark with your fabric pen at this point at both the top and bottom of the strip.
  17. Fold the strip to the right at this marked point. Press well.
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  18. With the end of the strip now extending to the right, measure from the edge of the fold you just made to the right ½". Place a pin or make a mark with your fabric pen at this point at both the top and bottom of the strip.
  19. Fold the strip to the left at this marked point. Press well. Your pleating is all done.
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  20. Fold the original 4" 'panel' back over to the left. If you measured correctly, it should cover up all the pleats and extend beyond the edge of the final fold you made by 1". Press in place.
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  21. Fold in the remaining left 'panel'. The fold should be exactly along the raw edge of the 4" panel. This final panel will overlap and extend about 1½" beyond center. Press well.
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  22. Flip the finished piece over to reveal a center 2" panel with two ½" pleats to each side of it.
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  23. Fold the finished placket in half and mark the position for the three shirt buttons as shown.
    NOTE: We're back to the real fabric in our photos now
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  24. Hand sew the three buttons in place
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  25. Set aside.

Attaching the flange and creating the pillowcase body

  1. Press the two flange strips in half lengthwise, wrong sides together. Once pressed, each strip is now 1" wide.
  2. Align the raw edges of the folded flange with the raw edge of each pillowcase body piece.
  3. Using a ½" seam allowance, stitch each flange to each pillowcase body.
  4. Place the two pillowcase body pieces (with the flanges sewn in place) right sides together.
  5. Pin along both sides and across the bottom.
  6. Stitch both sides and across the bottom, using a ½" seam allowance.
    Image
  7. Zig zag, overcast or serge the raw edges of all the seam allowances so when the pillowcase is laundered these do not fray.
  8. Turn the pillowcase right side out. Push out the trimmed corners from the inside to make nice, square corners on the outside. Use your finger or a blunt edge tool, like a large knitting needle or a chopstick. Press well.
    Image
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Pillowcase trim

  1. Press a double-fold hem along one long edge. To do this, turn up the edge ½" and press, then turn up another 4" and press again.
    NOTE: As an option, you can finish this edge with an overcast stitch, zig zag stitch or serger. We chose not to because we had thoroughly pre-washed our flannel and, with the folded-in edge in place, felt we had secured all the raw edges.

    Image
  2. Unfold the pressed hem. Your fold lines will remain.
    Image
  3. Fold the 9" x 41" trim piece in half, right sides together, so it is now: 9" x 20½".
  4. Pin in place securely along a ½" seam allowance line.
  5. Test to see if this 'trim circle' fits the pillowcase body by slipping the trim circle over the open end of the pillowcase. The open edge of the pillowcase body and the trim circle need to be a perfect match. If the trim circle seems a bit too big or too small, adjust your seam allowance accordingly.
  6. Using the appropriate seam allowance you tested above, stitch along the 9" raw edge. Press the seam allowance open.
    Image
  7. Find your pleated placket. center it over the seam of the trim piece. Pin in place.
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  8. Take the trim loop, with the placket pinned in place, to your sewing machine.
  9. Lift up the first pleat to either side of the buttons, and run a seam along each side to secure the placket to the trim.
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  10. Lay the pleats back down into place and run a line of topstitching ¼" in from each folded edge.
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  11. Re-fold the ½" first fold of the bottom hem. Re-press and pin in place.
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  12. Edgestitch this part of the hem in place. It will become the finished edge inside your pillowcase.

Finish the pillowcase

  1. Again, slip your trim circle over the open end of your pillowcase body, right sides together, matching the raw edge of the pillowcase opening with the raw edge of your trim piece. Pin all around.
    Image
    NOTE: This is another point to TEST your seam allowance. Place a few pins horizontally along the ½" seam line. Then, check from the right side to see if the flange reveal is really how you want it to be.
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  2. Once you've tested and insured you have the proper seam allowance to give you the correct flange reveal, stitch all around the pillowcase opening, using a ½" seam allowance.
  3. Press the seam up towards the pillowcase trim.
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  4. Trim back the seam allowance to ¼". Again, as an option, you can finish this edge with an overcast stitch, zig zag stitch or serger. We chose not to.
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  5. 'Re-fold' the remaining 4" of the trim's hem, following the pre-pressed line. This will bring the folded edge of the trim around to the inside of the pillowcase. (This is shown in the photo above and in the diagrams below.)
  6. The folded/edgestitched hem of the trim should neatly overlap the inside pillowcase/trim seam.
    Image
  7. Pin in place.
    Click to Enlarge
    NOTE: We pinned in place from the inside to insure we fully covered the the inside seam all around. Then, we turned the pillowcase right side out, re-pinned from the front, and removed the pins from the inside.
  8. As you look at your pillowcase from the front, you should have 4" of trim showing from seam to folded edge.
  9. Topstitch ¼" in from the seam - on the trim side, to secure the trim's hem in place. Press well.

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If you like these pillowcases, check out our other variations:

Teen Pretty Pack: Sleep-over Pillowcase

Fresh Linens: Restful Rose-Banded Pillowcases with Honey Bun Accents

Mother's Day: Charmeuse Satin Pillowcases with Velvet & Lace Trim

Visions of Sugarplums Christmas Pillowcases

Visions of Sugarplums Christmas Pillowcases for Kids

Contributors

Project Design: Alicia Thommas
Sample Creation: Kathy Andrews, What Sew Ever

Other machines suitable for this project include the Singer Stylist 7258 and the Elna 3230.

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Comments (12)

Janet Ash said:
Janet Ash's picture

I'm going to do the Jellyroll method with this patern.

Anonymous said:
Anonymous's picture

Anyone have problems with their long hair getting caught on the buttons?

button2 said:
button2's picture
Thanks, I did finish the pillow case. They are so neat. My problem wasn't the inside hem. Just that flange on the outside.I had to reopen the seam to release. Because I just had to have the flange go up on the outside towards the tuxedo pleat.I do sew, and have made things more advanced. [removed]void(0); Maybe the next one ! Thanks for such a wonder sewing site.
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture
@ button2 - Well... still not sure if I have it but here goes: you are pressing the seam allowance up. Take a look at the picture below Step 4 in the Finish The Pillowcase section. The seam allowance is pressed up and then trimmed back and then covered up by the folded hem of the cuff on the inside. Then, when you do your final line of topstitching around the cuff, you will go through this pressed-up seam allowance. You just want the area where the pillowcase joins the cuff to be as flat as possible and neat on the inside. Any way you can make that happen is totally a-okay. Please don't lose any more sleep over it smilies/cheesy.gif.
button2 said:
button2's picture
Hello, My flanges are caught in the side seams. They are ok in the down towards pillowcase body.But the directions say , Press the seam up towards the pillowcase trim. I have read the other pillow directions. Hope the light comes on soon for me. If you only knew how many times I have read over and over.Thanks Liz
Liz Johnson, Editor, Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson, Editor, Sew4Home's picture
@ button2 - I'm sorry, I'm a bit lost with your question. The flanges are cut 2" wide, folded wrong sides together to make them now 1" wide and then pinned to each main case with the raw edges aligned... which, yes, would mean the folded edge of the flange is pointing down. This way, when you sew on the tuxedo part, the flange will be visible below the seam. I'm not sure what you cut to 1/2".... there aren't any steps about cutting the flange to 1/2". I'm sorry to not be able to be of more help, but trouble shooting long distance is always a challenge. I'd suggest reading through the instructions again and maybe also looking at some of the links for our other pillowcase tutorials at the end of the article. There are additional photos with each of these pillowcases, which might help the confusion.
button2 said:
button2's picture
Ok this should simple, and I know it is. My flange is down position at the side seams.I was understanding them to go that way till I saw they were to go up.I sewed the flange on the right side,then put the two sides rigt side and serged.I cur one flange strip then cut it 1/2 was I to do this. I know what needs done but can't get there thanks
Michelle Granato said:
Michelle Granato's picture
So unique and clever! On my to do list for some holiday gifties smilies/smiley.gif
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture
@ Karen Sews - How you did your links works just fine. All content on Sew4Home is copyrighted and cannot be republished, but using a small photo with a photo credit and then linking directly to our site is correct. Thank you for checking with us as it can be tough to police copyright on the wild world of the Internet. And - thanks for spreading the word.
Karen Sews said:
Karen Sews's picture
Hi.

I just wanted to compliment you on all of the wonderful, well-done tutorials you’ve provided on this site.

And just to let you know, I’ve linked to several of your tutorials on my website (because I’m sure my visitors would love to know about them), with a small, thumbnail-sized image of the item, a direct link to the tutorial, and credit to Sew 4 Home.

You can find some of the links in these sections:

http://sewingsupport.com/sewin...-bags.html

http://sewingsupport.com/sewin...age-2.html

http://sewingsupport.com/sewin...urses.html

Please let me know if you prefer that I not link to you.

Karen
http://www.sewingsupport.com
Wag Doll said:
Ooh love the tuxedo pleat detailing, great design!

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