New Janome 15000-Leaderboard Left

Facebook Twitter Sew4Home RSS Feed Follow Me on Pinterest Instagram

Sew4Home

Diamond Girl Apron featuring Little Miss Sunshine: It's Moda Moms Week

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

Our final project for Moda Moms Week is a signature Sew4Home apron in the cheerful Little Miss Sunshine collection by Lella Boutique, which delivered this month to your favorite fabric retailer. We offer a full pattern download below that allows you to create the perfect angles of our Diamond Girl design. These patterns are a big job to produce in a way that works well for construction yet still allows you to output the pieces on your home printer. Please join us in sending equally big thanks to Moda Fabrics for their sponsorship support; it’s what makes offering this free pattern possible.

We love the sweet colors of Little Miss Sunshine as well as the wide variety of floral styles and coordinating geometric blenders. It was a mix-and-match picnic.

For our apron, we selected four fabrics from the collection, two from the Summer Sky colorway and two from the Leaf colorway. To these, we added a perfectly coordinated Bella Solid in Spray. Other colorways within Little Miss Sunshine include: Buttercup, Peach, Cloud, Berry, and Night Sky. All the hues of a idyllic summer day, sunrise to sunset.

One of the things that makes this apron so interesting is the combination of sharp angles and soft gathers – each emphasizes the other. Plus, with the fun little flounce at the bottom, you can kick up your heels and twirl to celebrate the summer days.

We were so pleased to be able to meet Vanessa Goertzen of Lella Boutique at Fall Quilt Market in Houston last year and have been very much looking forward to bringing you a project in Little Miss Sunshine. It’s such a happy collection! Vanessa has been designing fabric for Moda since 2013. Her debut collection was the adorable Into The Woods, followed by the scrumptious colors of Gooseberry, and now: Little Miss Sunshine.

Custom piping adds distinctive lines along the bib, ties, skirt, and pockets. The pretty diagonal lines probably have you thinking, “uh oh; bias cuts.” Nope. Clever Vanessa included a diagonal stripe in her collection, like rays of sunshine, rather than the traditional vertical or horizontal. That means you can do straight cut strips for all the piping but still end up with a cool bias look.

Our thanks to Moda Fabrics for sponsoring our Moda Moms Week. You can find Moda fabrics at fine in-store and online retailers everywhere. Connect with them on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, and YouTube; as well as via the Moda Cutting Table Blog and Moda Bakeshop. Little Miss Sunshine is available now at most retail outlets as both full yardage and pre-cuts. 

As with store-bought aprons, our design is meant to be one-size-fits-all. However, we realize you may still wish to make yours smaller or larger. As a reference, the apron’s bib is about 7¼” from the center of the "V" to the waistband and the 11½” wide across the bottom, including the piping. The skirt is approximately 18½” long from the top of the waistband to the longest point at the center and curves up to about 14" at each side edge, again including the waistband. The waistband is 20” across and each waist tie is 36”. And, the neck ties are 38” long and meant to be knotted rather than tied in a bow.

Sewing Tools You Need

Fabric and Other Supplies

Getting Started

  1. Download and print the TEN pattern pieces, which have been bundled into one PDF to make the download easier.
    IMPORTANT: Each page of the pattern download is ONE 8½" x 11" sheet. You must print the PDF file at 100%. DO NOT SCALE to fit the page. There is a guide line on each page so you can confirm your final printout is to scale.
  2. Cut out each pattern piece along the solid line. Following the arrows printed on the pattern pieces, assemble the two pieces that make up the Apron Bib, the three pieces that make up the Apron Yoke, and the four pieces that make up one half of the Apron Flounce, which is cut on the fold. To assemble, butt the pieces together and tape; do not overlap. The pocket is a single pattern.
  3. From the fabric for the bib front, flounce front, yoke back, and back skirt side panels (Picnic Linen in our sample); cut the following (photos are shown of each pattern cut so you can see each assembled pattern piece): 
    TWO 13” wide x 18” high rectangles
    Using the Apron Bib pattern, cut ONE

    Using the Apron Yoke pattern, cut ONE

    Using the Apron Flounce, cut ONE on the fold
  4. From the fabric for the front skirt side panels, yoke front, and pockets (Happy Dance in our sample); cut the following: 
    TWO 13” wide x 18” high rectangles
    Using the Apron Yoke pattern, cut ONE
    Using the Apron Pocket pattern, cut FOUR
  5. From the fabric for the bib back and flounce back (Sunshine in our sample); cut the following:
    Using the Apron Yoke pattern, cut ONE
    Using the Apron Flounce pattern, cut ONE on the fold
  6. From the coordinating solid for the ties and waistband (Spray in our sample); cut the following:
    FOUR 2½” x 39” strips for the apron bib/neck ties
    TWO 2½” x 21” strips for the waist band
    TWO 7” x 36” strips for the waist ties
  7. From the fabric for the piping (Candy Stripe in our sample), cut FOUR 1½” x WOF (width of fabric) strips.
  8. From the lightweight interfacing, cut the following:
    TWO 1½” x 38” strips for the apron bib/neck ties
    ONE 1½” x 20” strip for the waistband
    Using the Apron Yoke pattern, cut ONE
    Using the Apron Bib pattern, cut ONE
    Using the Apron Pocket pattern, cut TWO
  9. To get all the angles to work correctly so you end up with the pretty sweeping curve of the apron’s skirt, the side panels can’t be simple rectangles; they must have an angle cut across the top. The drawing below illustrates this angle. Find the four side panels. Position each panel right side up on your cutting surface. Measure 4” down from the panel’s outer top corner. Then draw a diagonal line from the inner top corner to that outer marked point and slice along the line.
  10. Measure and cut the two front side panels. 
  11. Then, repeat to measure and cut the two back side panels. Remember to slice this angle at the top of each panel. 

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

Create the piping

  1. Find all the 1½” piping strips and the ⅛” cording. 
  2. Pin the strips together end to end at right angles. Draw a diagonal line across each right angle. Stitch along each drawn line. 
  3. Trim back the seam allowance to about ¼”.
  4. Press the finished strip flat. You will need at least 133” to work with. 
  5. Fold the fabric strip in half lengthwise, wrong sides together. The long raw edges should be flush.
  6. Unfold so the crease line is visible. Place the matching length of cording down the center of the strip, running it along the crease line. 
  7. Wrap the fabric strip around the cording so the fabric is once again wrong sides together and the raw edges are flush. 
  8. Machine baste the layers together, running the stitch line close to the cording. 
    NOTE: As this piping cord is quite thin, you can use either a standard foot or a Zipper foot. We used our Clear Satin Stitch foot.
  9. Set aside the piping. You’ll cut each length to fit as you go. 

Create the bib

  1. Find the bib front and back and the bib interfacing. 
  2. Cut a length of piping to fit along the top edge of the bib. Give yourself a bit extra at each end.
  3. Place the interfacing against the wrong side of the bib front. All edges should should be flush. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place. 
  4. Flip the bib front so it is right side up and flat on your work surface. 
  5. Pin the piping along the top “V” of the bib front. 
  6. At either end, open up the piping’s basted seam and clip back about ½” of piping cord. This helps keep your seam allowances flat. 
  7. Machine baste the piping in place along the top of the bib. Stitch into the point of the “V”, pivot, then stitch up and out of the point to the opposite corner.
  8. Find the bib back. Place it right sides together with the bib front, sandwiching the piping between the layers. Pin along the top edge only 
  9. Attach a Zipper foot. Stitch along the top edge only, running the seam as close as possible to the piping. 
  10. Clip into the point of “V” to help create a smooth turn. Clip all the up to but not through the stitching line. 
  11. Turn the bib right side out. The front and back pieces are now wrong sides together and the pretty piping is standing up along the top edge. Press flat. 

Create the bib/neck ties

  1. Find the four 39” bib/neck tie strips, the 38” strips of interfacing, and the piping.
  2. Stack the four fabric strips. Cut one end at a 45˚ angle through all four layers.
  3. Repeat to cut a matching angle through the stack of four interfacing strips. 
  4. Center an interfacing strip against each fabric strip so there is ½” of fabric extending beyond the interfacing on all sides. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse each interfacing strip in place.
  5. Cut two lengths of piping to fit along the outer edge of two strips (straight end to pointed end). Give yourself a bit extra at each end.
  6. Open each end of each piping strip and cut back the cord about 1” at the pointed end and about ½” at the straight end. 
  7. Pin a piping strip along two of the fabric strips. You are working on the right side of the fabric on what will be the outer edge of the finished bib/neck tie. The raw edges of the piping are flush with the raw edge of the fabric strip. Pin from straight cut end to pointed end. 
  8. Machine baste each length of piping in place. 
  9. Find the two remaining fabric strips. Place them right sides together with the piped strips, sandwiching the piping between the layers. 
  10. Pin together along the entire piped edge and across the angled end. 
  11. Measure 10" up from the straight end of each pair of ties and mark with a pin along the non-piped side. This will be the stopping point for your seam. Continue pining from this marked point up to the angled end. 
  12. We stitched with a Zipper foot along the piped edge then switched back to a regular foot to finish the angled end and the non-piped edge. 
  13. Stitch the piped edge first from the straight cut end up to point. Stitch right off the end of the tie.  
  14. Reposition the tie under the presser foot and stitch across the angled end. The stitching will cross over itself at the corner and maintain a nice, flat point at the end of the piping. 
  15. Pivot at the opposite corner and continue stitching back down the opposite long side, stopping and locking your seam at the 10" pin mark. 
  16. Repeat to stitch together the remaining pair of tie strips. 
  17. Clip the corners and the points and turn the two ties right side out. Gently push out the point so it is as sharp as possible. A long blunt tool, like a knitting needle or chopstick works well for this.
  18. Press flat, pressing in the raw edges along the 10” opening so they are flush with the sewn seam. 

Attach the ties to the bib

  1. Find the bib. 
  2. Slip the 10” open end of a tie over each side edge of the bib, encasing the raw edges of the bib between the layers. The bib should go in between the layers of the tie about ½” along each side. Pin in place from the top of the bib to the bottom. 
  3. Make sure the machine is threaded with thread to best match the tie fabric in the top and bobbin. Lengthen the stitch. 
  4. Edgestitch along inside edge of the tie, through all the layers, from the bottom edge, up to the top and across the angled end, stopping the seam at the point of the piping.
  5. Set aside the finished bib.

Create the pockets

  1. Find the four pocket pieces, the two pieces of pocket interfacing, and the piping. 
  2. Cut a length of piping to fit along the top edge of each pocket. Give yourself a bit extra at each end. 
  3. Place an interfacing piece against the wrong side of two of the fabric pocket pieces (these will become the pocket fronts). All edges should should be flush. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place.
  4. Pin a length of piping along the top edge of the two interfaced pocket pieces. 
  5. As above, open up the piping at each end and cut back the piping cord about ½”.
  6. Machine baste each length of piping in place.
  7. Place a plain pocket panel right sides together with each piped panel, sandwiching the piping between the layers. Pin along all sides, leaving an approximate 2" - 3” opening along one side. 
  8. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch the layers together. Remember to pivot at the corners and points and to lock your seam at either side of the 3” opening. 
    NOTE: As above with the ties, We stitched with a Zipper foot along the piped edge then switched back to a regular foot to stitch around the sides and bottom of the pocket.
  9. Clip the corners and points and press open the seam allowance.
  10. Turn right side out through the opening. 
  11. Gently push out the corners and points. Press the pockets flat, making sure the raw edges along the openings are flush with the sewn seams. 
  12. Set aside the pockets.

Create the yoke and flounce for the skirt’s center panel

  1. Find the yoke front, the matching yoke interfacing, and the piping. 
  2. Cut a length of piping to fit along the bottom edge of the yoke. Give yourself a bit extra at each end.
  3. Place the interfacing against the wrong side of the fabric. All edges should be flush. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place.
  4. Flip the yoke front right side up. 
  5. Pin a length of piping along the bottom edge. It’s similar to how you piped the bib. Clip at the point to allow the allow the piping to ease around this curve.
  6. As above, open up the piping at each end and cut back the piping cord about ½”.
  7. Machine baste the piping in place along the bottom of the yoke. Stitch into the point of the “V”, pivot, then stitch up and out of the point to the opposite corner.
  8. Find the front flounce. Run one or two lines of gathering stitches along the top edge. 
    NOTE: If you are new to machine gathering, we have a handy step-by-step tutorial. 
  9. Adjust the gathers to fit the bottom of the yoke. 
  10. Place the gathered flounce right sides together with the bottom edge of the yoke, sandwiching the piping between the layers. Adjust the gathers so they are even along the bottom edge of the yoke. Pin in place.
  11. Using a ½” seam allowance and the Zipper foot, stitch the flounce to the yoke. Stitch into the point of the “V”, pivot, then stitch up and out of the point to the opposite corner. It’s best to stitch with the gathers facing up so you can insure they stay even and flat.
  12. Repeat to create a center panel with the back yoke and flounce. The only difference is there is no interfacing on the back yoke.

Add the side panels and place the pockets

  1. Find the front side panels. Place one panel, right sides together, along each side of the center yoke/flounce panel. The upper edge or point of each side piece will extend about ½” above the top of the yoke. This is correct and is formed because of the intersecting angles. 
  2. Pin in place along both sides of the center panel. 
  3. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch both side panels in place. 
  4. Press open the seam allowances.
  5. Flip the completed skirt front right side up and flat on your work surface. Find the two pockets. 
  6. Place a pocket to either side of the center panel.
  7. The inside edge of the pocket should be 1” from the center panel seam and the piped edge of the pocket top should be in line with the piping of the yoke. Use your clear ruler to get this slight angle correct for the pocket. Pin each pocket in place along both sides and around the bottom.
  8. Edgestitch each pocket in place along both sides and across the bottom. Go slowly, stopping to pivot at each of the points along the bottom of the pocket. 
  9. Repeat to add the back side panels to the back center panel, but without the pockets.

Assemble the skirt layers

  1. Place the front and back skirt layers right sides together. All raw edges should be flush. 
  2. Pin along both sides and along the bottom.
  3. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch both sides and along the bottom, pivoting at the corners. 
  4. Press open the seam allowances.
  5. Turn the skirt right side out through the open top edge. Press flat. Pin the layers together along the top. 

    NOTE: Moda fabric is top quality and has great substance. With this skirt length, we didn’t need any edgestitching to hold our layers together. If you feel your skirt layers are shifting against one another too much, you can add a line of edgestitching along each side edge. You could even align the center panel seams and run a line of topstitching along each center panel seam, within the side panels. Again, this is completely optional.

Create the waist ties

  1. Find the two 7” strips.
  2. Fold each strip in half. Pin along one end and down the long side. The opposite end remains open and raw.
  3. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch across the one end and down the side, pivoting at the corner. 
  4. Clip the corners and press open the seam allowance. 
  5. Turn each tie right side out through its open end and press flat. The seamed edge will become the bottom edge of the tie.

Attach the waist band to the skirt and bib and add the waist ties

  1. Find the waist band panels, the waist band interfacing, and the remaining piping.
  2. Cut a length of piping to fit the length of the waist band. Give yourself a bit extra at either end. 
  3. Center the interfacing against the wrong side of one of the waist band panels (this will become the front waist band). There should be ½” of fabric showing beyond the interfacing on all four sides. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place. 
  4. Flip the interfaced panel right side up. Fold back each end of the panel (the 2½” ends) ½” and press to set a verticle crease line. Unfold so the waist band is once again its full 21” length. 
  5. Place the piping along one long side of the waist band. As above, open up each end and cut back the piping cord ½”. Pin the piping in place. 
  6. Machine baste the piping in place. This piped edge will become the bottom edge of the front waist band. 
  7. Measure to find the exact center along the bottom piped edge and mark with a pin.
  8. Repeat to mark the center point along the plain top edge of the waist band.
  9. Find the skirt. Run one or two lines of gathering stitches across the top of both side panels. Do not gather across the yoke; it remains flat. 
  10. Pull up the gathering stitches evenly along each side until the top of the skirt measures 20” 
  11. Place the gathered skirt top right sides together with the bottom piped edge of the waist band. The side edges of the skirt panel should each sit ½” in from the raw edge of each end of the waist band. Use the waist band’s crease lines as your guide. Pin the skirt to the waist band. 
  12. Using a Zipper foot and an approximate ½” seam allowance, stitch through all the layers, starting and stopping the seam at the crease lines at the ends of the waist band. We say approximate, because your goal is to run the seam as close as possible to the piping. It’s best to stitch with the gathers facing up to make sure the stay as even as possible. 
  13. Fold the waistband up into position, revealing the piping. Press the seam allowance up toward the waistband. 
  14. Find the apron bib. Measure to find the exact center point along its bottom raw edge. 
  15. With right sides together, align the center point of the bottom of the apron bib with the previously marked center point along the top raw edge of front waist band. 
  16. Continue pinning across the bottom of the apron bib. 
  17. Find the waist ties. Align the raw end of each tie with each raw edge of the waist band. 
  18. The bottom seamed edge of the waist tie should be flush with the bottom seam of the waist band so the tie's seam sits right along the piping. Pin in place.
  19. The top folded edge of the waist tie should sit ½” below the top raw edge of the front waist band panel. Pin in place. The excess fabric at the center of the tie will bow up slightly.
  20. Fold a small pleat with the excess fabric so the tie sits flat against the waist band.
  21. Find the remaining back waist band panel. Fold up one 21" raw edge ½” and press in place. 
  22. Layer the back waist band panel right sides together with the front waist band panel, sandwiching the waist ties between the layers. The top raw edges should be flush as should the ends. The bottom folded edge should align with the bottom piped seam of the front panel. Pin in place along both ends and across the top. 
  23. Pin together the finished ends of the waist ties at the center of the apron to keep them out of the way.
  24. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch across both ends and along the top of the waistband through all the layers, pivoting at the top corners. The seams along the ends should be in line with the side seams of the skirt panels.
  25. Clip the corners and grade the seam allowance at each end.
  26. Press the waist band’s bottom seam allowance up and and its top seam allowance down. 
  27. Un-pin the waist ties and pull them out into position. As you bring the bib up, fold the back waist band down so it covers the seam allowance along the back of the apron. Pin in place.
  28. Handstitch the bottom of the waist band in place across the back of the apron. Press well.

Contributors

Project and Pattern Design: Alicia Thommas
Sample Creation and Instructional Outline: Debbie Guild

Tags: 

Section: 

Comments (6)

Tammy Springer said:
Tammy Springer's picture

I just finished making Moda's lovely Kitchen Confections apron last night, and now I open my laptop to see yet another gorgeous apron creation for my list! These patterns are nicely detailed, easy to follow and deliver such professional looking results -- Thanks, Moda! The last one taught me how to create box and knife pleats. I wonder what I'll learn this time?

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:

@ Tammy - Thanks. These are actually Sew4Home's apron designs, done in gorgeous Moda fabric to inspire you with ideas on how to use their amazing collections. We're so glad the instructions and patterns were so successful for you!

Kelly Schott said:
Kelly Schott's picture

thank you so much for creating and sharing this fabulous apron pattern!  I am in love with all things apron and this is probably one of the prettiest aprons I have ever seen.  I was in love with the "Little Miss Sunshine" fabric line since the moment I laid eyes on it!!  Can't wait to make one!

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:

@ Kelly - thanks so much. It is a great combo of fabric and pattern - you'll love making it!

DebS said:
DebS's picture

I love everything about this apron. This is my new project! I'm going out today to pick up all the supplies I need. I hope I can find this color material because it perfectly matches all my decor.

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:

@Deb - Thanks! We can't wait to see your finished apron.. Post a picture on Facebook or Instagram!

Add new comment

*Sew4Home reserves the right to restrict comments that don’t relate to the article, contain profanity, personal attacks or promote personal or other business.
By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.