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Beginner-Friendly Back-To-School Totes: Hawthorne Threads

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Sew4Home is well-known for designing fashionable and functional bags and totes. From shoppers to satchels, carry-alls to coin purses; creating a wonderful bag for yourself or as a gift is a great sense of accomplishment. We put our heads together with our friends at Hawthorne Threads to come up with a cool tote that would be perfect for beginners. This is it! Yes it's easy, but the style is so cute and classic, everyone will have fun making it. More experienced? Add a bit of extra embellishment, such as a monogram on the pocket or fancier handles. The exterior fabric for our sample totes comes from Hawthorne Thread's large selection of canvas beauties

One of the things that makes our Sew4Home exclusive designs stand out is how we are able to include high-end style and professional finishing details, yet still keep the construction steps clean and easy. 

These totes have crisp boxed corners, motif-matched exterior pockets, beautifully coordinated linings, topstitching detail, and more. The end result can be achieved even by someone brand new to sewing. 

We offer two different handle styles. The Apple for the Teacher tote has short, sewn-in handles with one sporting a pretty bow. The Paper Mache tote has longer, shoulder straps with adjustable D-rings. Choose one or try them both!

A pattern download is offered below for the pockets. It is a simple rectangular cut, for which we wouldn't normally provide a pattern, however, we use it to show you the tricks to getting a perfect motif match of the exterior pocket against the front panel. 

Keep an eye out throughout the project for links that take you to additional how-to tutorials. Plus, remember to browse our Project Index if there are other skills you're looking to improve. We have a great library of step-by-step instructions for all kinds of both basic and specialty techniques. 

Our recent projects with Hawthorne Threads have focused on their beautiful in-house, digitally printed collections. If you haven't already, check out our Lightweight Designer Backpack in Marsala and the Sofa Caddy in three designs from their Golden Canyon colorway.

For these beginner totes, we branched out to browse the huge Hawthorne Threads selection of other designer fabrics and substrates, landing on our cute combos of canvas and cotton from Cotton and Steel and Michael Miller Fabrics. Direct online shopping links are provided below in the supply list so you can re-create our exact bag style.

Our thanks to Hawthorne Threads for sponsoring today's totes. If you've not visited them before, do yourself a favor and explore today. Their eye for fashion trends and beautiful blends is spot on. We've always loved the choices, and they just keeps growing and getting better and better.

Each tote finishes at approximately 14" wide x 12" high x 3" deep. 

Sewing Tools You Need

Fabric and Other Supplies    

Supplies shown are for one tote

Getting Started

NOTE: All our exterior pieces were carefully fussy cut. We show you how to create a perfect pocket match below. This is optional, but is a great pro-finish detail. 

  1. Download and print out the Pocket and Ring Tab pattern sheet.
    IMPORTANT: Both patterns are on ONE 8½" x 11" sheet. You must print the PDF files at 100%. DO NOT SCALE to fit the page. There is a guide rule on the page so you can confirm your final printout is to scale.
  2. Cut out each pattern piece along the solid line (the ring tab is only used on the longer adjustable straps).
    NOTE: Your printer paper may be transparent enough to allow the pattern matching steps shown below. If you have trouble seeing through the printout, trace the pattern onto tissue or pattern grid fabric. 
  3. From the fabric for the exterior, facings, and pockets (Apples Canvas and Paper Cuts Canvas in our samples), fussy cut the following:
    TWO 19" wide x 15" high rectangles for the exterior panels - for the best look the motif should be the same on the front and back panels
    TWO 19" wide x 3" high strips for the facings
    FOR THE LONGER ADJUSTABLE STRAPS: Using the pattern, cut TWO ring tabs.

Exterior Pockets

  1. For a perfect pattern match, find one of the two exterior panels. This will be the front panel; the two exterior panels should be the same, but if you feel one of your two is better than the other, choose it as the front. 
  2. Measure for pocket placement. The pocket should sit 4" down from the top raw edge of the fabric panel and be centered 6½" in from each raw side edge. Pin the pocket pattern in this position.
  3. Using a pencil, trace a few parts of the fabric's motif onto the pocket template to indicate parts of the printed fabric. This will help you visually line up the print when you cut out the front pocket. Draw as many parts as you feel necessary to get a good match. If you're just beginning, you might find it helps to not only draw around the edge but to also trace a bit of the pattern inside the pocket.
  4. Remove the pocket pattern from the fabric panel and take it over to the remaining exterior fabric. Lay the template on the right side of the fabric and move it around until you perfectly match the tracing on the template to the motif on the fabric. Pin in place. 


  5. Cut out the matching exterior pocket.
  6. Using the same pocket pattern, cut ONE additional pocket front for the lining pocket. This one does not have to match as it will sit against the lining fabric as a contrast. 

Additional cuts

  1. From the fabric for the lining (Clementine Ta-Dot and Colibri in Citron in our samples), fussy cut the following:
    TWO 19" wide x 13" high rectangles for the lining panels
    Using the pattern, cut TWO pocket lining panels
    FOR THE SHORTER HANDLE'S OPTIONAL BOW: Cut ONE 27" wide x 5" high strip
  2. From the fusible interfacing, cut TWO 19" x 15" rectangles.
  3. From the webbing:
    FOR THE LONGER, ADJUSTABLE STRAPS, cut TWO 30" lengths
    FOR THE SHORTER HANDLES, cut TWO 12" lengths

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

  1. Find the exterior panels and the interfacing panels. Following manufacturer's instructions, fuse an interfacing panel to the wrong side of each exterior panel, aligning all the edges of the fabric and interfacing. 

Make pockets

  1. Find the two exterior pocket panels and the two lining panels. 
  2. Pin each exterior panel right side together with a lining panel, leaving a 3" opening along the bottom for turning.
  3. Using a ½" seam allowance, stitch the layers together, pivoting at the corners and remembering to lock your seam at either side of the 3" opening. 
  4. Press open the seam allowances and clip the corners.
  5. Turn the pocket right side out. Using a long, blunt end tool push out the corners so they are nice and sharp. A long knitting needle or chopstick works well for this. 
  6. Press the pocket flat, pressing in the raw edges of the seam allowance at the opening so they are flush with the sewn seam.

Place pocket 

  1. Find the front exterior panel and the front pocket. 
  2. Lay the pocket on the front exterior panel, matching up the motif on the two pieces. Pin in place. As measured above, the pocket should sit 4" down from the top raw edge of the fabric panel and be centered 6½" in from each raw side edge. Pin the pocket in place.
  3. Re-thread the machine with the contrasting thread in the top and bobbin and lengthen the stitch. 
  4. Edgestitch the pocket in place on the front panel along both sides and across the bottom, pivoting at the corners. This seam seals the opening in the pocket used for turning. 

Assemble the exterior panels and box the corners

  1. Place the front and back exterior panels right sides together, aligning all the raw edges all around. Pin along both sides and across the bottom. 
  2. Re-thread the machine with regular thread in the top and bobbin and re-set the stitch length to normal.
  3. Using a ½" seam allowance, stitch along both sides and across the bottom, pivoting at the corners. 
  4. With the sewn exterior still wrong side out, create 3" box corners, which means your "box" will be half that size or 1½". Measure a box at each corner.
  5. Cut out both boxes.
  6. Press open the seam allowances.
  7. Align the side and bottom seams, flattening each corner into a little peak. Pin across the corner. 
  8. Using a ½" seam allowance, double stitch across the corner.

    NOTE:
    If you are new to this technique, check out our tutorial: How To Box Corners for more details.
  9. Turn the main bag right side out, push out the corners and press.

D-rings loop for longer, adjustable straps

  1. Find the two small loop rectangles. Fold each in half and pin in place.
  2. Using a ½" seam allowance, stitch each tiny side seam. The ends remain raw and open.
  3. Trim back the seam allowances to ¼".
  4. Turn right side out, roll the seam to the back, and press each loop flat. 
  5. Find the front exterior panel with its pocket in place. Measure and mark for the D-rings loop and strap end placement.  On this front panel, the D-rings are on the left and the strap end is on the right. 
  6. Slip one loop through two D-rings. Align the raw edges. Place the loop 4" in from the left side seam. Pin in place. The raw ends of the loop should be flush with the top raw edge of the exterior panel. The rings are hanging down.
  7. Find one 30" length of webbing. Place one end of the webbing 4" in from the right side seam. Pin in place. The raw end of the webbing should be flush with the top raw edge of the exterior panel.
  8. Machine baste the D-rings loop in place.
  9. And, machine baste the strap end in place.
  10. Our design is to have the D-rings line up and sewn-in straps line up front to back when assembled. This means the positioning on the back exterior panel is opposite from the front. 
  11. Find the back exterior panel. Place it right side up and flat on your work surface. 
  12. Place the other D-rings loop 4" in from the right raw edge of the panel, then place the one end of the other 30" length of webbing 4" in from the left raw edge of the panel. Pin in place and then machine baste in place as you did on the front panel. 
  13. We also ran a zig zag stitch across the free end of each strap to help prevent it from raveling. If you do this, make sure your machine is threaded with thread to match the webbing in the top and bobbin. 

Small handles

  1. For the small handles, both ends of the shorter lengths of webbing are sewn in place. 
  2. Each end of the handle loop should sit 5½" in from a side seam. 
  3. As above, the end of raw edge of the webbing is flush with the top raw edge of the panel. Make sure there are no twists in the loop prior to basting in place.

Lining

  1. Find the two lining panels and the two facing strips. 
  2. Place a lining strip right sides together along the top of each lining panel. Pin in place.
  3. Using a ½" seam allowance, stitch the facing in place. 
  4. Press the facing, and its seam allowance, up and away from the lining panel. 
  5. Find the remaining pocket. Place it on one lining panel. It should sit 4½" down from the top raw edge (the top of the facing band) and be centered side to side.
  6. As above, pin in place and then edgestitch in place along both sides and across the bottom, pivoting at the corners. We used the same contrasting thread as for the front pocket and again lengthened our stitch. 
  7. Place the front and back lining panels right sides together, sandwiching the sewn pocket between the layers. Pin in place along both sides and across the bottom, leaving an 8" opening along the bottom for the final turn right side out. 
  8. Return to matching thread in the top and bobbin and re-set for a normal stitch length. 
  9. Using a ½" seam allowance, stitch along both sides and across the bottom. Remember to pivot at the corners and to lock your seam on either side of the 8" opening. 
  10. Following the same steps above as for the exterior, box both bottom corners of the lining. If you are new to this technique, remember to check out our tutorial: How To Box Corners for more details.

Final assembly

  1. With the lining wrong side out and the exterior right side out, slip the exterior inside the lining so the two are now right sides together. Align the side seams and the bottom boxed corners. Position the lining so its pocket is against the back of the exterior; you want the exterior and interior pockets to be opposite one another. In the photo below, we have pulled away the exterior from the lining to show the pocket position and also to show how the raw end of the strap is loose and out of the way between the layers. 
  2. Pin together all around the top, making sure the raw edge of the facing aligns with the raw edge of the exterior. For the adjustable straps, you are sandwiching the D-rings and their tabs, as well as one end of each strap between the layers, but remember, the free ends of the straps are loose. For the short handles, both ends of both handles are sandwiched between the layers. 
  3. Using a ½" seam allowance, stitch all the way around the top edge. We used a standard presser foot. 
  4. If you are making the version with the adjustable straps, you may want to switch to a Zipper foot in order to keep the seam consistent and you pass the D-rings.
  5. Turn the bag right side out through the opening in the bottom of the lining. 
  6. Press the top seam flat and then push the lining down into position inside the exterior. Press again all around the top seam.
  7. In necessary, re-thread with the contrasting thread in the top and bobbin. Re-set for a longer stitch length. Edgestitch around the very top of the bag. We used the Janome Edge Guide foot
  8. Run a second line of topstitching 1½" down from the upper edge. You could first measure and mark a guide line to follow, use markings on your machine's throat plate, or as we did, use a quilt bar.
  9. Hand or machine stitch the opening in the bottom of the lining. 
  10. For the optional bow we featured on the short handled sample, make a simple tube. 
  11. Find the 5" x 27" strip of lining fabric. Fold it in half, right sides together. Pin along each end and along the side, leaving a 3" - 4" opening along the side for turning. 
  12. Using a ½" seam allowance, stitch across each end and along the side. Remember to lock your stitch at either side of the opening and to pivot at the corners. 
  13. Clip the corners and press open the seam allowance. 
  14. Turn right side out through the opening and press flat, pressing in the raw edges of the opening so they are flush with the sewn seam. 
  15. Hand stitch the opening closed. 
  16. Tie the bow at the base of one side of the front handle. 

Contributors

Project Design: Alicia Thommas
Sample Creation and Instructional Outline: Debbie Guild

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Comments (7)

Doris Kelley said:
Doris Kelley's picture

Did You wash the material first?  Can the canvas be washed?  Thanks

Quilty Things said:
Quilty Things's picture

Thought it was just me...couldn't find it either. 

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@ Quilty Things - The print/mail/PDF icons are now there. Internet glitch. 

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@ FlygirlJ3 - didn't forgot - just an internet glitch. The icons are there now if you refresh. Sometimes, of the 1,234,567 things that have to work perfectly, one puts up a struggle 

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