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Canvas Weekender Duffle: Dritz Gunmetal Hardware

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This super-stuffable duffle fills up with plenty of stuff then cinches down into a compact and easy-to-carry box shape. Dritz® hardware makes it all work! We added both carry handles as well as an adjustable shoulder strap. The strap can be completely detached, which makes the bag a good option for travel – no dangling strap to get caught on things. You’ve likely seen this classic style before. It reminded us of a vintage college sports duffle. Read on to see how we’ve demystified the steps to creating the zip-wrap-and-clip combo that gives the top of the duffle its signature silhouette. 

When we work with new products from our friends at Dritz®, we like to challenge ourselves to incorporate as many great options as possible. With hardware, it’s easy, because not only do the products add a pro finish, each one is functional, allowing you to snap, clip, slip, and click. Added benefit: cool sound effects! The University Duffle features eight different hardware elements, each one performing its own important job. 

Tough canvas is ideal for the exterior fabric, and a bright color, like the cherry red we chose, is a welcome change from the blacks and browns of so many travel bags. We paired the exterior canvas with a railroad stripe denim for the lining. Fusible fleece is what gives the bag additional structure without compromising its flexibility. The bag can fold flat for easy storage.

To use the shoulder strap. First unhook the base Swivel Hook from the Triangle Ring. Then, clip the strap into position on the Triangle Rings, using the the Large Swivel Hooks on each end of the strap. The sides of the zipper will pull up, a bit like little ears, providing a sturdy over-the-shoulder carry option. As mentioned above, when you want to just use the handles, you can completely detach the strap, stowing it inside the bag. 

There are a lot of steps below, but don’t let that scare you off! If you’re a Sew4Home regular, you know we pride ourselves on the detail of our instructions, which means we’ll always err on the side of giving you additional information and explanations rather than not enough. Throughout the steps are links to other helpful S4H tutorials to further advance your understanding of specific techniques, such as boxed corners and smooth curves. We recommend you read through the instructions several times before starting. We call this “making it in your head.” It’s a great way to visualize prior to diving in. 

Dritz® always has lot of fun ideas and products to keep your sewing easier and more creative. To find out more, we invite you to visit their website or blog; or follow them on Pinterest, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube

You can find Dritz® notions and hardware at fine in-store and online retailers everywhere. We’ll keep everyone posted as all the new Dritz® products roll-out over next few weeks. We’ve been told Joann stores are one of the first outlets that will be carrying the new styles and finishes. 

With the sides clipped into place, our duffle finishes at approximately 10" high x 16" wide with a 8" base and sides. Unclipped, the full height is about 14” from base to zipper. The carry handles have an approximate 4” drop and the detachable strap is about 58” fully extended. 

As with most commercial bags, for the longest life, this duffle is meant to be spot cleaned. Spraying the outside with a stain repellant, such as ScotchGard or similar is a good protective step. All the elements are machine washable, and on a gentle cycle in cold water, you could like get away with a full wash. However, tumble drying isn’t recommended. Let the bag air dry after any cleaning.

Sewing Tools You Need

Fabric and Other Supplies

ALL OUR HARDWARE IS IN THE NEW GUNMETAL FINISH FROM DRITZ®. THE NEW PRODUCT IS ROLLING OUT TO ONLINE AND IN-STORE OUTLETS NOW AND SHOULD BE FULLY IN PLACE BY MARCH 2017. 

  • TWO Dritz® 1” Large Hook & D-Ring sets
  • ONE Dritz® 1” Adjustable Slide Buckle
  • TWO Dritz® 1” Triangle Rings
  • TWO Dritz® ¾” Swivel Hooks
  • FOUR Dritz® Rectangle Rings
  • TWO Dritz® Heavy Duty Snaps
  • Dritz Snap Pliers or Setting Tools for Heavy Duty Snaps; we used #24P Snap Pliers
  • ONE Tassel Cap – for the optional tassel
  • ONE Dritz® Small Swivel Hook & D-Ring set – for the optional tassel
    NOTE: You will end up with two large D-Rings (from the Large Hook & D-Ring sets for the adjustable strap) and one small D-Ring (from the Small Swivel Hook set for the tassel). Keep them handey in your stash; D-Rings are one of the most flexible pieces of hardware for all kinds of straps, handles, and more.
  • 1 yard of 54"+ wide mid-weight canvas, denim or similar in a solid color for the exterior; we used 60" 9.3oz 100% Cotton Duck Canvas in Cherry Red
  • 1 yard of 54"+ wide lightweight denim or similar for the lining; we used 56" 4.7oz Railroad Denim in Indigo by Robert Kaufman 
  • 4½ yards of 1” wide cotton webbing; we used natural cotton webbing
  • 1 yard of 44"+ fusible fleece; we used Pellon Thermolam Plus
  • ¼ yard of 20"+ mid-weight fusible interfacing; we used Pellon Décor Bond
  • Scrap or ⅛ yard of thin faux leather or similar for the optional tassel; you need just a 3” x 6” strip – we used a fashion weight faux calfskin in natural from our stash
  • ONE 24” zipper; we used a YKK Brastique zipper
  • ONE sheet of plastic canvas or similar; optional to further stabilize the base - you need just one 16” x 8” piece
  • All-purpose thread to match fabric and webbing
  • See-through ruler
  • Measuring tape
  • Fabric pen or pencil
  • Seam gauge
  • Seam ripper
  • Scissors or rotary cutter and mat
  • Craft scissors for cutting the zipper
  • Iron and ironing board
  • Straight pins 
  • Dritz® Fray Check seam sealant; optional to help finish some of the cut webbing ends
  • Glue for tassel cap; we used an appliqué/patch glue
  • Small pliers and screwdriver for tassel cap; jewelry tools or an eyeglass repair kit will work

Pattern

  • Download and print the Pocket Flap pattern.
    IMPORTANT: This pattern download consists of ONE 8½" x 11" sheet. You must print the PDF file at 100%. DO NOT SCALE to fit the page.
  • Cut out the pattern piece along the solid line.

Getting Started

  1. From the exterior fabric, cut the following: 
    TWO 25" wide x 13" high rectangles for the top exterior panels
    TWO 25" wide x 7" high rectangles for base exterior panels
    ONE 7" wide x 11" high rectangle for the base exterior pocket 
    Using the pattern, cut ONE pocket flap
  2. From the fabric for the lining, cut the following:
    TWO 25" wide x 19" high rectangles for the main panels; cut with the railroad stripe running vertically
    ONE 10" wide x 13" high rectangle for the lining pocket: cut with the railroad stripe running vertically
    TWO 3” x 4½” strips for the Triangle Ring tabs; cut with the railroad stripe running horizontally 
    TWO 2” x 2½” strips for the Swivel Hook tabs; cut with the railroad stripe running horizontally
    Using the pattern, cut ONE pocket flap: cut with the railroad stripe running vertically
  3. From the fusible fleece, cut the following: 
    TWO 24" x 12" rectangles for the top exterior panels
    TWO 24” x 6” rectangles for the base exterior panels
  4. From the mid-weight interfacing, cut the following:
    ONE 6" x 5" rectangle for the exterior pocket base
    ONE 9” x 6” rectangle for the lining pocket
    Using the pattern, but cutting along the inner stitching line rather than the solid line, cut ONE pocket flap
  5. From the webbing, cut the following:
    FOUR 11½” lengths for the handle strapping
    TWO 18” lengths for the handles
    ONE 62” length for the adjustable strap
  6. From the faux leather for the tassel, cut ONE 3” x 6” rectangle.
  7. From the plastic canvas, cut ONE 16” x 8” rectangle. 

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

Fuse the exterior panels

  1. Find the four exterior panels (two large top panels and two narrow base panels) and the four pieces of fusible fleece.
  2. Center a fleece panel on the wrong side of each exterior panel. The fleece should be centered side to side and top to bottom, which means there should be ½” of fabric showing beyond the fleece on all sides. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place. 
  3. Set aside the fused panels.

Create the exterior pocket

  1. Find the flap exterior, flap lining, and the flap interfacing. 
  2. Center the interfacing on the wrong side of the flap exterior so there is ½” of fabric showing beyond the interfacing all around. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place. 

  3. Place the flap lining and the fused flap exterior right sides together and pin in place, leaving a 2-3” opening along the top straight edge for turning. 
  4. Using a ½” seam allowance stitch together. Go slowly around the bottom curves to maintain an even seam allowance, pivot at the corners, and remember to lock your seam at either side of the 2-3” top opening. 
  5. You want a very smooth flap, so generously clip the bottom curves and grade the seam allowance along the sides and across the bottom; leave the seam allowance intact along the top. 
  6. Turn the flap right side out through the top opening. Gently round out the button curves and push out the upper corners. A long, blunt tool works well for this, such as a knitting needle, chopstick or point turner. Press flat, pressing in the raw edges at the opening so they are flush with the sewn seam. 
  7. Make sure the machine is threaded with thread to best match the exterior in top and bobbin. Lengthen the stitch slightly. We used the Janome Edge Guide foot to maintain a precise ⅛” seam allowance. 
  8. Edgestitch along both sides and across the bottom. Do not stitch across the top. 
  9. Find the 7” x 11” exterior pocket panel. Fold it in half so it is now 7” x 5½”. Press to set a crease. Unfold, wrong side up, so the crease line is visible. 
  10. Find the 6” x 5” piece of mid-weight interfacing. Place is against the bottom half of the pocket panel on the wrong side. One 6” edge of the interfacing should be aligned with the crease line of the pocket panel and there should be ½” of fabric showing beyond on the interfacing on the remaining three sides. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place. 
  11. Re-fold the pocket panel wrong sides together, sandwiching the interfacing between the layers. There is no additional pre-stitching on this part of the pocket; it is secured in place with the handle strapping. 

Place the exterior pocket and the handle strapping

  1. Find one of the top exterior panels, which should have its fleece panel already fused in place. 
  2. Place the panel right side up and flat on your work surface. 
  3. Place the pocket base panel right side up on the exterior panel. The pocket should be centered side to side and the bottom raw edges of the folded pocket should be flush with the bottom raw edge of the main panel. 
  4. Along the bottom of the pocket, find the center point, which will be 3½” in from either raw side edge. Mark this center point with a pin. Then, measure 2¾” to the right of the center point and draw a vertical line from the bottom raw edge up 10½”.
  5. Repeat to draw a parallel vertical line 2¾” to the left of center.
  6. Find two of the 11½” lengths of webbing. 
  7. Align the inner edge of each length of webbing along the drawn guide lines, overlapping and concealing the side raw edges of the pocket. Pin the webbing in place.
  8. There should be 5½” between the lengths of webbing. Make sure this distance remains consistent from the bottom raw edge all the way up to the 10½” point. 
  9. Place the flap into position to check that the webbing distance is correct. The flap should sit between the webbing; it should not overlap onto the webbing. Adjust the position of the webbing if needed.
     
  10. Remove the flap. 
  11. Find the two Dritz® Rectangle Rings. Slip the top free end of each length of webbing through a ring. Bring the webbing through from front to back. 
  12. The raw end of the webbing should be pulled through 1”, which means the bottom of the ring should now sit right at the 10½” point. Pin the pulled-through end in place.
  13. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the webbing in the top and bobbin. Keep a slightly lengthened stitch. 
  14. Edgestitch from the bottom of the panel, up one side, getting as close to the bottom of the ring as possible. 
      
  15. Pivot and stitch across. Create a 1” Open Box or a 1” X Box, then edgestitch down the opposite side of the webbing to the bottom raw edge of the panel. Repeat to secure the remaining length of webbing. 
    NOTE: If you are new to creating an X Box, we have a full tutorial you can review prior to starting this project. 

Add the snaps

  1. With both lengths of handle strapping in place, find the flap again. 
  2. Use the original paper pattern to mark the position on the flap for the top half of each snap. 
  3. Cut a tiny hole at each marked point through all the layers. 
  4. Insert the snap cap from the front through to the back.
  5. Place the back half of the snap into position over the front half’s post
  6. Using the proper tool (we used the Dritz Heavy Duty Snap Pliers), squeeze the two halves together to set the snap. 
  7. Repeat to insert the second top snap half.
    NOTE: If you are brand new to working with snaps, we have a full tutorial on Setting Metal Snaps that you are review prior to starting this project. 
  8. The Dritz® Heavy Duty Snaps in gunmetal have such nice, sleek finish!
  9. Place the flap into position between the webbing.
  10. The top edge of the flap should sit ½” above the top of the pocket. 
  11. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the exterior fabric in the top and bobbin. Keep a slightly lengthened stitch. 
  12. Edgestitch across just the top of the pocket. This secures the flap and seals the opening used for turning. 
  13. Use the flap snaps to mark the position for the bottom halves of the snaps that will be inserted into the pocket base.
  14. Place the snap parts similarly to the steps above.
  15. Set both into position. As mentioned above, check out our Metal Snaps Tutorial if you are new to setting snaps. 
  16. Place the two remaining lengths of handle strapping into position on the remaining exterior panel. There is no pocket on the back panel, so you will simply stitch each length, making sure the positioning exactly matches the front webbing.

Create the lining

  1. Find 10” x 13” lining pocket panel. Fold it in half so it is now 10” x 6½”. Press to set a crease. Unfold, wrong side up, so the crease line is visible. 
  2. Find the 9” x 6” piece of mid-weight interfacing. Place is against the bottom half of the pocket panel on the wrong side. One 9” edge of the interfacing should be aligned with the crease line of the pocket panel and there should be ½” of fabric showing beyond on the interfacing on the remaining three sides. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place. 
  3. Re-fold along the center crease line, but right sides together. Pin along both sides and across the bottom, leaving an approximate 3” opening along the bottom for turning.
  4. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the lining fabric in the top and bobbin. Re-set the stitch length to normal. 
  5. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch along both sides and across the bottom. Remember to pivot at each corner and to lock your seam at either side of the 3” opening. 
  6. Clip the corners and press open the seam allowance. 
  7. Turn right side out through the opening. 
  8. As you did above with the exterior pocket flap, use a long, blunt tool to gently push out all the corners so they are sharp.
  9. Press flat, pressing in the raw edges of the opening so they are flush with the sewn seam.
  10. Find one of the main lining panels. Place it right side up on your work surface. 
  11. Place the pocket right side up on the lining panel. The pocket should be centered side to side and approximately 6½” down from the top raw edge of the lining panel. Pin the pocket in place along both sides and across the bottom. Remember, the folded edge the pocket top.
  12. Draw in the two pocket division lines. These can be adjusted to best meet your own needs, but on our sample, we create one vertical division line at the pocket’s exact center point, and a second vertical division line 1” in from the left finished edge of the pocket as a pen/pencil pocket. 
    NOTE: Remember, whenever you’re working on the right side of your fabric, make sure your marking tool is one that will easily wipe away or will vanish with exposure to the air or the heat of an iron. 
  13. Lengthen the stitch slightly. Edgestitch the pocket in place along both sides and across the bottom, pivoting at the corners. This seam closes the opening used for turning.
  14. Stitch along each of the drawn guidelines from the bottom up to the pocket top. If possible, for the neatest finish, use a lock stitch to secure your seam at the beginning and end, or leave the thread tails long and pull them through to the back, hand-knotting to secure.
      

Place the zipper

  1. Place the front exterior panel right side up and flat on your work surface. 
  2. Center the zipper across the top. The zipper should be right side down on the panel. Pin the zipper in place.
  3. Find the non-pocket lining piece. Place the lining panel right side down on top of the front panel, sandwiching the zipper between the layers. 
  4. The top raw edge of the lining panel should be aligned with the top raw edge of the exterior panel and the zipper tape. Open the zipper about half way. Pin well. 
  5. Re-thread the machine with thread to best coordinate with the exterior, lining, and zipper. We used an ivory thread in the top and bobbin. Re-set the stitch length to normal 
  6. Stitch across the top through all three layers, using a ¼” seam. We used our Janome Quarter Inch Seam foot; you could also use a Zipper foot
     
    NOTE: All with all zipper insertions, when you feel you are approaching the zipper pull, stop with your needle in the down position. Raise the presser foot and twist the layers slightly so you can access the pull. Then move the pull out of the way of the presser foot. Once clear, drop the presser foot, re-position the layers, and finish the seam. 
  7. Fold the lining back so the front exterior panel and the lining panel are now wrong sides together and the remaining free side of the zipper tape is sticking up. Press. 
  8. Make sure the zipper is still a bit open.
  9. Find the back exterior panel and the remaining lining panel (the one with the pocket). Make a second sandwich similar to the first one. Place the back exterior panel right sides together with the front exterior panel, aligning its top raw edge with the free edge of the zipper tape. Lightly pin in place. 
  10. Flip over the assembled unit and place the remaining lining panel right sides together with the in-place lining panel. The top raw edge of the lining panel should also be flush with the free edge of the zipper tape. As before, you have sandwiched the remaining free edge of the zipper between the layers; this time, between the back exterior panel and the back lining panel. 
  11. The two exterior panels are right sides together and the two lining panels are right sides together. Pin in place through all three layers.
  12. Stitch through all three layers along this second side of the zipper, again using a ¼” seam.
  13. As you did above, fold the exterior back and lining wrong sides together and press.
  14. Open up the entire unit so it lays flat. The exterior front and lining are wrong sides together to one side and the exterior back and lining are wrong sides together to the other side with the zipper in the middle. Press well and pin in place. 
  15. Again to double check, this is what the zipper unit looks like on the back side at this point. 
  16. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the exterior in the top and to best match the lining in the bobbin. Lengthen the stitch. Edgestitch along the zipper teeth on either side on the zipper to hold the fabric layers together.
  17. Stop to move the zipper pull out of the way so you can maintain a straight seam along either side.
  18. Make sure the zipper is open half way. 
  19. Fold the exterior panels right sides together. Align the raw edges along both sides and across the bottom. Pin in place along the sides only.
  20. Fold the lining pieces right sides together. Align the raw edges along both sides and pin in place
  21. You again have one flat piece, but this time, both the lining panels are to one side of the zipper and both exterior panels to the other side of the zipper. Both ends are open.
  22. Re-set the stitch length to normal. 
  23. You are going to stitch the side seams in four individual sections. Each seam will run from the bottom raw edge up to within 1” of the zipper.
  24. Measure 1” to either side of the zipper at each end and mark with a pin to give yourself a visible stopping point.
  25. With the four side seams complete, turn what is now a long tube with two open ends right side out and press the four side seams flat.

Make and place the side swivel hooks and attach the exterior base

  1. Find the two 2” x 2½” strips. Fold in each 2½” raw edge ¼” and press.
  2. Then, fold in half, aligning the folded edges. The strip is now ¾” x 2½”.
  3. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the tab fabric in the top and bobbin. Slightly lengthen the stitch. 
  4. Edgestitch along both 2½” sides of each strip. 
  5. Find the two Dritz ¾” Swivel Hooks. Slip a strip through the bottom ring of each hook, aligning the raw ends. 
  6. Find the main “tube,” which should still be right side out. Center a Swivel Hook over each exterior side seam. The raw ends of the Hook’s tab should be flush with the bottom raw edge of the exterior panel. The Hooks are a bit heavy, so it’s a good idea to safety pin or tape them up into position to keep them out of the way of the remainder of the construction. 
  7. Baste the ends of the tab in position within the seam allowance. 
  8. Turn the tube wrong side out again and set it aside. 
  9. Find the two 25” x 7” base exterior panels, which should both have their fleece panels already fused in position. 
  10. Place the panels right sides together and pin along both 7” sides. 
  11. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the exterior fabric in the top and bobbin. Re-set the stitch length to normal. 
  12. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch both sides, forming a loop.
  13. Press the seam allowances open and flat and turn the loop right side out. 
  14. Slip the base loop inside the bottom of the open end of the exterior tube. This means the two pieces are right sides together. The top opening of the base loop is flush with the bottom opening of the exterior end of the main tube. The side seams are aligned. Pin in place all around. 
  15. The swivel hook is sandwiched between the layers at the side seam allowances. 
  16. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch all around. 
  17. Pull the base panel down into position and press the seam allowance down. Turn the tube right side out once again. 
  18. Slightly lengthen the stitch and edgestitch all around the exterior tube within the newly attached base panel. We used our Janome Edge Guide foot

Box the corners

  1. Turn the newly extended tube wrong side out again. Flatten it so the side seams are straight and the bottom raw edges of both the exterior panels and the lining panels are flush. The panels are still right sides together to either side of the zipper: the exterior panels to one side and the lining panels to the other side. The zipper should also still be open at least a few inches. 
  2. Pin all the way across the bottom of the exterior panels. 
  3. Pin across the bottom of the lining panels, leaving a 6-8” opening at the center. 
  4. Box the corners on the exterior side first. 
  5. Using both hands, pinch and pull apart one bottom corner, forming a peak at the corner with the seam running down the exact center.
  6. Our finished boxed corner depth is 8”, which means you measure vertically from the corner point of your seam (the actual end point of the seam – not the tip of the fabric) down along the seam line, HALF the width of your finished corner – or 4" in our sample. Draw a line at this point and pin along the line.
  7. Re-set the stitch length to normal. 
  8. Stitch across the corner along the drawn line.
  9. Stitch across again just to the right of the previous line of stitching for extra security.
  10. Trim away the peak to ¼" from the line of stitching.
  11. Repeat to create a matching boxed corner on the opposite side.
    NOTE: If you are brand new to boxed corners, take a look at our full, step-by-step tutorial on the technique.
  12. Use the same steps to create matching boxed corners in the lining, re-threading as necessary with thread to best match the lining fabric. 
  13. Turn the entire unit right side out through the opening in the lining.
  14. Find the plastic canvas. Slip it down into place at the base of the exterior through the opening in the lining. 
  15. Hand or machine stitch the opening closed in the lining. We hand stitched
  16. With the plastic canvas flat and snugly in place, push the lining down in place inside the exterior, aligning the corners and the seams. 
  17. We added a few additional hand tacks at the corners of the lining to further help hold it down in position inside the bag. If you choose to do this, just be careful that your stitches are tiny and do not show through to the exterior. 

Zipper end tabs

  1. Once right side out, and with the zipper closed, you’ll see that the duffle naturally begins to form into a kind of a triangle at either end of the the zipper. And, oh my goodness, the ends of the zipper are unfinished! Take a breath, this is how it’s supposed to be. The raw ends will be covered by the zipper tabs, which are attached to the Dritz Triangle Rings that allow the ends to pull down and clip into place with the base Swivel Hooks. You knew it would all come together, right?!
  2. Find the 3” x 4½” tabs. Fold each tab in half so it’s now 1½” x 4½”. 
  3. If need be, re-thread the machine with thread to best match the tab fabric in the top and bobbin. The stitch length should be normal. 
  4. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch along all three sides, pivoting at the corners and leaving an approximate 1” opening for turning. Clip the corners
  5. Turn the small tab right side out and press flat, pressing in the raw edges at the opening so they are flush with the sewn seam. This opening will be stitched closed with the final edgestitching; for now, simply press well. 
  6. Find the two Dritz® Triangle Rings. Slip a tab through each ring, aligning the finished ends. Pin in place, close to the Ring. 
  7. At the top end of the zipper, keeping your triangle fold even to either side of the zipper, pin the ends together into a point.
  8. Baste across the point.
  9. Slip the Triangle Ring tab over the raw point. It should insert down between the layers about ½” - ⅝”. Pin in place.
  10. At the bottom end of the zipper, the zipper stop is too bulky to allow the tab to fit over the end smoothly. We suggest you stitch across the teeth just above the stop…
  11. … then cut out the stop. Remember, don’t use your good scissors for this step!
  12. Tidy up the end, then slip the tab into place just as you did on the head end of the zipper, and pin in place. 
     
    NOTE: The length of our tabs were based on a nice, full duffle. You can test the length at this point by filling your duffle with several rolled towels or sweaters to simulate how much you might want to carry. With the duffle filled up, pull the end tabs down and clip the Triangle Rings to the Swivel Hooks. While the Triangle Ring Tabs are just pinned in place, you can slid the tabs up or down slightly, biting off more or less of the zipper, to get your best fit. 
  13. Stitch each tab in place with an Open Box. We used the AcuFeed™ Flex foot on our Janome Skyline S7 for this step, which was helpful. Engage your machine’s feeding system or attach a Walking or Even Feed foot if possible. When carrying the duffle with just the shoulder strap, these tabs will hold the majority of the weight; we recommend stitching around the box twice or even three times for extra security.

Adjustable strap

  1. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the webbing in the top and bobbin. 
  2. Find the 62” length of webbing, the two 1” Dritz® Large Swivel Hooks and the 1” Dritz® Adjustable Slide Buckle. 
  3. Loop one end of the webbing through the center bar of the Adjustable Slide Buckle. Pull it all the way through and stitch in place to secure. We used a dense zig zag stitch, running across and back several times for a nice, tight seam.
  4. Feed the free end of the webbing through one of the Swivel Hooks, then bring the end back through the Adjustable Slide Buckle, going up and over the stitched-down end. This creates your adjusting loop. Before continuing, do a quick check to make sure the webbing is looped through so the swivel clip is facing right side up (closed side up) to match the right side up of the adjustable buckle. 
  5. Finally, slip the free end through the remaining Swivel Hook, pulling the end through about 1". Edgestitch in place. Before stitching, do one more quick check to make sure there are no twists in your strap. We added a line of Dritz® Fray Check seam sealant along each cut edge for an extra smooth finish.
     
    NOTE: If you’re new to working with adjustable straps, you can check out our Messenger Style Brief, Rocky Mountain Satchel or Diaper Bag all of which have additional detail and photos that you may find helpful in understanding the techique. 

Handle loops

  1. Find the two 18” lengths of webbing. 
  2. Slightly lengthen the stitch. 
  3. On one length, measure 3” in from each raw end and mark with a pin. Fold the webbing in half, and stitch from pin to pin, creating a double-layer handle loop with two flared ends. 
  4. Feed the flat, flared ends through the free side of the rectangle rings on the exterior handle strapping. Make sure you feed the end through from front to back, pulling the end of the webbing through a full ½”. Topstitch across, using a tight zig zag stitch to secure. 
  5. As above with the adjustable strap, we added a line of Dritz® Fray Check seam sealant along each cut edge for an extra smooth finish. 

Optional tassel

  1. Find the 3” x 6” rectangle of faux leather. Draw a horizontal line ½” down from the top 6” edge.
  2. Using this guide line as your stop point, cut fringe all the way across, slicing even centimeters (that’s about 3/16” wide slices, US folks). 
  3. Run a line of glue across the ½” solid header. 
  4. Tightly roll up the tassel. It’s easier to roll it tight and then let it release a bit to fit if need be. The opening of the Dritz Tassel Cap is about ⅝” in diameter. 
  5. Add another dab of glue to the rolled end.
  6. Insert the rolled end into the Tassel Cap.
  7. There’s a tiny screw included that should be inserted. As listed above, an eyeglass repair kit or jewelry tools would have something the right size. This screws into the material itself to help insure it stays secure. 
  8. The last link on the Tassel Cap chain is an open jump ring. To open it, rather than pulling the ends apart and stretching it out of shape, gently pull the two ends away from each other in a sideways motion. This is where having two pairs of pliers for griping, opening, and closing is helpful. Slip the jump ring over the ring of the Dritz® Small Swivel Hook, and gently squeeze close to finish. Clip the Swivel Hook onto on of the Rectangle Rings on the front of the duffle.
    NOTE: We used a very thin faux leather, similar to a garment weight material. Should you choose a different type of material, you may need a slightly larger or smaller starting piece, and might need to roll up the fringe tighter or looser. It just takes a small bit of fabric, so it’s fun to experiment with bits and pieces from your stash. And, this is just one of the fun new Tassel Cap designs from Dritz®. We’ll definitely be using more in future projects!

Contributors

Project Design: Alicia Thommas
Sample Creation and Instructional Outline: Debbie Guild

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Comments (10)

Adrienne G said:
Adrienne G's picture

Hello, I was wondering if someday will it be video tutorials?   

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Adrienne - No video tutorials planned at this time -- it's a pretty expensive undertaking to do it right. 

Tricia R. said:
Tricia R.'s picture

Thank you for the wonderful project! I've been working on it this weekend and all was going swimmingly--until the zipper end tabs. I can't seem to feed that bigger bundle through my machine. I tried a zipper foot, but that didn't do much. Do you happen to have any additional tips? (If it helps to know, I have a Janome 6300.) Thanks again!

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Tricia - So sorry you ran into a hiccup. As we mention above, we suggest a Walking Foor or similar. It helps to have a Walking foot's upper feed dogs so you're feeding from both the top and bottom. If you're having trouble getting started, a hump jumper can help level a traditional presser foot. As shown above, make sure you are flattening the ends and basting them prior to wrapping the end tabs in place. 

Elaine N. said:
Elaine N.'s picture

I really enjoy making your bags but sometimes have difficulty finding the products you use.  I love all the new Dritz products but unfortunately I cannot find them.  I went to the Dritz website and you can't even buy the products directly from them.  It is frustratring and expensive to have to order from different websites because the stores that sell Dritz products do not carry the full line needed.  It would be great if one of your sponsors would offer kits of the hardware used.  Thanks for all your tips and patterns.  I learn something new with each project.

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Elaine - As we mentioned above, this new gunmetal finish is just rolling out this month, so it may take just a bit to see it fully stocked in your favorite online and in-store outlets. We have reached out to a couple sponsors about bringing in additional hardware and/or providing kits. So far, we haven't had anyone jump at the chance, but we continue to talk about it. We will also continue to provide our full supply lists and links to buy as best we can. 

Janine O. said:
Janine O.'s picture

What a beautiful bag..... It is very difficult (if not almost impossible) to get Dritz hardware to where I live, which is France (Europe). Too bad. Thanks for all your super projects.

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Janine - So sorry - as a US site, it can be difficult to provide worldwide options for everything we feature. We will pass along your comment to our friends at Dritz to see what their suggestions on for global purchasers. So glad you love the pattern!

mssewsavvy said:
mssewsavvy's picture

Are you able to purchase from UK sites? Dritz is available in the UK (Amazon) and some craft store sites in the UK. ETSY as well

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