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Hanging Sewing Caddy with Clear-View Vinyl Pockets: Janome Skyline S7

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"Where did I put my ....?" Sewing projects are full of little bits and pieces, including numerous notions whose jobs are to make construction easier, but only if you can find them when you need them! Corral important items with our clever clear-view caddy. Janome America sent us the new Skyline S7 sewing machine to try out, and we felt the perfect project to showcase its precision stitching was something with multiple, tricky layers. 

Cotton, canvas, and clear vinyl are the power trio we came up with to test the Skyline S7's chops, plus we threw in some binding and decorative stitching for good measure. The S7 sewed through it all with flying colors, and we love the finished look of this handy mid-size caddy you can hang from a counter, cabinet, even an ironing board or cutting table. 

The Sew4Home studios are Janome studios. We've been fans of the brand for years, and as our exclusive sewing machine sponsor, we get to be one of the first to "test stitch" a variety of new models. 

What keeps us coming back again and again is the ease-of-use of all the Janome models. Whether we're working with an entry-level compact or the top-of-the-line computerized dream machine, we know we'll be able to sew with it right out of the box, navigating the features intuitively and logically. The Skyline S7 began arriving at authorized Janome America dealers late last month. We'd heard initial good things, and were excited to try it out for ourselves.

The S7 is the newest model in Janome's Skyline series. We've used the Skyline S5 quite a bit, and have been very happy with all of the functions. So we were pleased to see our favorite features were still there, including the automatic thread cutter, extra high presser foot lift, and 9mm stitch width. While it shares its looks with the S5, the S7 includes even more Janome exclusive features. We love the built-in AcuFeed™ Flex Fabric Feeding System: it makes stitching through thick layers and challenging fabrics a breeze; and the Automatic Presser Foot Lift: when you hit the auto-thread-cut button, the presser foot and needle raise simultaneously. These are features normally found only on the very top-of-the line models. 

 

This caddy is designed with the size and rigidity to hang straight down from a counter or table - because don't you hate it when a caddy swings backwards, making everything harder to reach?! The layering, interfacing, and fabric/vinyl weights are all balanced to create the best, most balanced effect.

Because of this extra stability, we were able to add a secret, full-width pocket on the back of the caddy. It makes a great place to store an instruction manual or pattern sheets.

Two large Dritz® Home plastic grommets allow the caddy to hang from hooks or even be clamped in place. We used and recommend the flexible Command brand removable hooks. They make it very easy to get exact placement and will work on just about any surface. Plus you can remove and re-use them if you want to move the caddy into a new position. 

The Skyline S7 has 70 additional decorative stitches for a total of 240 plus seven alphabets and 11 one-step buttonholes. We added double lines of pretty decorative stitching on the canvas backing that is visible through the clear vinyl pockets. Plus, the two largest pockets along the bottom even feature decorative stitching on the vinyl itself

We used pre-packaged binding for both the top of the pockets and the perimeter of the caddy. For a extra professional finish, when creating the pocket divisions, we recommend taking the time to change out your thread color as you stitch from the vinyl (we used white to match the white canvas backing) to the binding (we used red).

Our thanks again to Janome for providing the new Janome Skyline S7. To stay up-to-date on all the news from Janome, visit their website and/or follow the creativity on their blog, Pinterest, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube 

Our caddy finishes at approximately 16" x 18" with two rows of four 4" x 3" pockets, one row of four 4" x 4"pockets, and one row of two 4" x 8" pockets. The hidden back pocket is 16" x 8".

Sewing Tools You Need

Fabric and Other Supplies

Getting Started

  1. From the fabric for the front accent bands and back pocket (Mum in Red in our sample), cut the following:
    ONE 1½" x 16" strip for the bottom accent band
    ONE 3½" x 16" strip for the top accent band
    ONE 16" x 16" square for the back pocket
  2. From the fabric for the back panel (Orange Peel in Multi in our sample), cut ONE 16" wide x 18" high rectangle.
  3. From the fabric for the front base panel (white canvas in our sample), cut ONE 16" wide x 18" high rectangle.
  4. From the clear vinyl, cut the following:
    TWO 22" x 3" strips for the two top pocket panels
    ONE 22" x 4" strip for the third pocket panel
    ONE 18" x 4" strip for the bottom pocket panel
  5. From the heavyweight interfacing, cut ONE 16" x 18" rectangle.
  6. From the mid-weight interfacing, cut ONE 16" x 8" rectangle.
  7. The binding will be cut to length during construction.
  8. The strips of tear away will also be cut to length during construction. 

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

Back panel and pocket

  1. Find the back panel, the back pocket, the heavyweight interfacing panel, and the binding.
  2. Fold the square pocket panel in half, wrong sides together, so it is now 8" x 16". Press to set a center crease. The top raw edges will become the top of the pocket, the folded edge will become the bottom of the pocket. If you have a directional motif, fold accordingly. 
  3. Unfold the pocket so the crease line is visible. 
  4. Place the mid-weight interfacing against the wrong side of one half of the pocket, aligning one long side of the interfacing with the center crease line of the pocket. The other three sides of the interfacing should be flush with the raw edges of the pocket fabric. Following manufacturer's instructions, fuse the interfacing in place.
  5. Re-fold the pocket wrong sides together, sandwiching the interfacing between the layers.
  6. Cut a length of bias tape binding 16" to fit across the top of the pocket.
  7. Slip the binding over the top of the pocket, remember, the raw edges are the pocket top. The raw edges should sit right up against the fold of the binding. 
  8. Pin the binding in place. 
  9. Thread the machine with thread to match the binding in the top and bobbin. 
  10. Edgestitch the binding in place, removing the pins as you go.
  11. Place the heavyweight interfacing against the wrong side of the main back panel. All edges of the interfacing and fabric should align. Following manufacturer's instructions, fuse the interfacing in place. The heavyweights take more heat and pressure to adhere properly. Press well from both sides. 
  12. Place the fused main back panel right side up on your work surface. Place the pocket on top of the main panel. The sides and bottom edge of the pocket should be flush with the sides and bottom edge of the main panel. Pin in place, then machine baste in place, using a ⅛" - ¼" seam allowance along both sides and across the bottom.

Create the front base panel

  1. Find the front base panel and the top and bottom accent bands. You'll notice that the base panel is a full 16" x 18" cut and the accent bands are overlays rather than seamed panels. This is to insure the base panel is a consistent weight from the top to the bottom. This helps insures the caddy will hang straight, and it also gives the top grommets a better surface to "bite" into. 
  2. Press back one long raw edge of both the top and bottom accent bands. If you have a directional fabric, press back the top 16" edge of the bottom band and the bottom 16" edge of the top band. We used our Hot Hemmer.
  3. Place the base panel right side up and flat on your work surface. 
  4. Place the bottom accent band on the base panel along the bottom edge. The raw edges of the two pieces should be flush. Pin in place.
  5. Repeat to place the top accent band on the base panel along its top edge. The raw edges of the two pieces should be flush. Pin in place.
  6. Re-thread if necessary with thread to best match the accent fabric in the top and thread to best match the base panel in the bobbin.
  7. Edgestitch each accent band in place along its folded edge.

Add the decorative stitching

  1. Using a clear ruler and fabric pen or pencil, the next steps are to draw in the guidelines for the decorative stitching as well as the pocket base seams and pocket division seams. 
  2. You are working on the right side or the fabric, so make sure you are using a pen that will easily wipe away or will vanish with exposure to the air. 
  3. The drawing below shows the various dividing lines. 
  4. Starting at the bottom edge of the top accent band, measure down 1" and draw a horizontal line. 
  5. Also from the bottom edge of the top accent band, measure down 3" and draw a second horizontal line. 
  6. From the second horizontal line, measure down 1" and draw a third horizontal line. 
  7. From the third line, measure down 3" and draw a fourth horizontal line. 
  8. From the fourth horizontal line, measure down 1" and draw a fifth horizontal line. 
  9. From the fifth line, measure down 4" and draw a sixth horizontal line. 
  10. From the sixth line, measure down 1" and draw a seventh horizontal line. 
  11. From the seventh line, measure down 4" and draw an eighth horizontal line.
  12. All eight horizontal lines should be exactly parallel with one another. 
  13. Now you'll add all the vertical pocket division lines. These lines will be harder to wipe away, so make them as faint as possible. Your best bet would be a fabric pen whose ink vanishes with exposure to the air. 
  14. Again referring to the illustration above, draw in the dividing lines. There is one main line through the exact center, 8" in from each side. This line goes from accent band to accent band. The other two lines are 4" to the right of center and 4" to the left of center. These two lines start at the top accent band and stop at horizontal line #6.
  15. Cut a strip of tearaway stabilizer wide enough to bridge both lines of decorative stitching and the full 16" of the base panel's width. Pin a strip behind the canvas at horizontal lines #1, #3, #5 and #7.
  16. Set up your machine for decorative stitching with the first of your chosen stitch patterns. Thread the machine with the first of the two contrasting color threads. Our sample uses a coral thread in the top position for each of the decorative pairs.
  17. Stitch along horizontal lines #1, #3, #5 and #7.
  18. For all decorative stitching, we recommend using the machine's start/stop button rather than the foot control and running at a slow to medium speed.
  19. Re-thread the machine with the second of the two contrasting color threads. Our sample uses a lime green thread in the bottom position for each of the decorative pairs. Re-set the machine for the second of your chosen stitch patterns. 
  20. Using the bottom edge of the previous stitch line as a guide, stitch the second line, creating four paired lines of decorative stitching. As always, we recommend testing your stitch patterns and widths prior to starting.

Prepare the vinyl pockets

  1. Find the four strips of vinyl. 
  2. The bottom 4" x 18" pocket features decorative stitching on the vinyl itself. 
  3. Cut a piece of tearaway stabilizer to match the vinyl: 4" x 18". Draw a horizontal line through the middle of the stabilizer strip. Clip the strip behind the vinyl.
  4. Set up your machine for decorative stitching. Thread the machine with one of the two contrasting color threads. We recommend the top color of the paired lines (coral in our sample). Choose a stitch pattern that is fairly open; you don't want to punch too many holes in the vinyl and it's best if the stitch doesn't move backward – only forward. There'll be less likelihood of tearing.
  5. Using the drawn line on the stabilizer, which is visible through the vinyl, stitch across the center of the vinyl. As above, we recommend using the machine's start/stop button rather than the foot control and running at a slow to medium speed. 
  6. Remove the stabilizer from the back of the vinyl. Depending on the density of your stitch pattern, you may need to use a pair of tweezers to pick out a few stabilizer fragments.
  7. Cut a length of binding to fit along the top edge of each vinyl strip. 
  8. As you did above with the back pocket, slip the binding over the top edge of the vinyl and pin or clip in place. The ever-so-slightly longer edge of the binding goes to the back.
  9. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the binding in top and bobbin. Re-set the machine for lengthened straight stitch. 
  10. Edgestitch the binding in place on each vinyl pocket strip. 
  11. Rather than draw our stitching marks on the vinyl, we opted to use tape markings. All the pens we tried tended to smear on the vinyl. 
  12. On the top three pockets, measure in from the right raw side edge of the vinyl and make a mark at 5" in, 11"  in and 17" in. 
  13. Measure along the bound edge of the of the top three pockets at the same points from the right raw side edge: 5" in, 11" in and 17" in. 
  14. For the bottom pocket, you need just one set of marks at 9" from the right raw side edge of the vinyl. 
  15. Cut strips of tearaway stabilizer to fit behind the vinyl at each of the drawn vertical lines. You'll need 10 strips as there are 10 pocket division lines. 
  16. Place the pockets in position on the base panel, aligning the marks on the vinyl with the vertical drawn lines on the front base panel. Remember, there is a small chunk of stabilizer between the layers. You can also use the original drawn horizontal lines #2, #4, #6 and #8 as guidelines for the bottom edge of each pocket.
  17. You are working on the flat surface of the base panel, so you really can't pin or clip the vinyl strips in place. Instead, to keep the marks aligned, we suggest using low tack tape as well as holding onto the vinyl with your fingers.
  18. Make sure the machine is still set for a lengthened straight stitch. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the binding in the top and bobbin (we used red), and stitch just across the binding along the vertical pocket division line. 
  19. Re-thread with thread to best match the base panel fabric in the top and bobbin (we used white), and stitch the remainder of the vertical pocket division line. 
  20. Remove the "marking tape strips" as you go; don't try to sew directly over the tape as it will be to hard to remove from the seam. 
    NOTE: As mentioned in the introduction, taking the time to change thread colors gives you a pro finish, but is optional. 
  21. Remove the stabilizer from each seam as you finish. 
  22. Repeat at each of the 10 pocket division lines. Each of the three top pockets has three vertical division lines. The bottom pocket has just one division. We recommend starting at the center and working out to each side. Remember, the vinyl with "bow up" between the vertical seams because you haven't yet done the pleating. This is correct.
  23. We also aligned the raw side edge of each vinyl piece with the raw side edge of the fabric panel and machine basted the two layers together. As above, the vinyl will "bow up" in the center. Securing the vinyl at the sides will make it easier to pleat. 

Pleat the pockets

  1. At each vertical pocket division, you will make a small pleat. Pinch ½" of vinyl to the right of the division seam to create a fold. Bring the fold down so it aligns to the vertical seam. Pin in place at the binding; tape in place at the bottom. 
  2. Repeat to pinch ½" to the left of the seam and bring the fold down to match with the first. Ta-da: a vinyl pleat. Tape in place.
  3. Repeat at each of the 10 pocket division seams. 
  4. Below is a drawing that may help you visualize the pleating pattern of the top three rows...
  5. ... and the bottom row.
  6. Re-thread the machine if necessary with thread to best match the base panel in the top and bobbin and stitch across the bottom edge, following along the original drawn horizontal lines #2, #4, #6 and #8.
  7. Remove all the little pieces of low-tack tape. Wipe away the drawn lines as best you can.

Layer and bind to finish

  1. Place the front and back panels wrong sides together and clip around the entire perimeter.
  2. Use a small glass or other object to round all four corners. We used our Hot Hemmer.
  3. Trim along the curve at each corner.
  4. Machine baste the layers together around the entire perimeter, staying very close to the edge. We used the needle position function to move the needle all the way to the right. 
  5. Cut a length of binding about 76" long. 
  6. Open up the binding flat and clip it to the edge all around. You are working on the front of the caddy. Start at the bottom center of the caddy, leaving approximately 3" free at the head of the binding. 
  7. The binding is attached as you would attach traditional quilt binding. If you are new to this technique, check out our full binding tutorial.
  8. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the binding in the top and bobbin. 
  9. Stitch the binding in place, following along in the first fold of the binding. 
  10. When you have stitched all around the perimeter and are back near where you began, stop about 3" from the starting point. Lock the seam.
  11. Remove the project from the machine. 
  12. Pull the ends of the binding away from the edge of the project, and place the ends right sides together at a 90˚ angle. Pin together, then test that the binding lays flat when you place it back against the project.
  13. Stitch the ends together.
  14. Trim the seam allowance back to ¼". Position the binding back along the caddy and finish your seam, matching the previous stitching line and making sure the raw edges of the fabric are still flush. Be sure to lock your stitch at the beginning and end of the seam.
  15. Bring the binding up and around to the back of the caddy and pin in place. 
  16. Hand stitch the binding in place at the back.

    NOTE: You are welcome to try a machine stitch to secure your binding. We opted for a hand finish, similar to a quilt binding, to insure the very cleanest look from the front. For additional detail and other finishing options, we have two full binding tutorials: Figuring Yardage, Cutting, Making and Attaching as well as A Complete Step-by-Step for Binding Quilts and Throws.

Add the grommets

  1. Our grommets are centered in each top corner: 1½" from the top pocket's binding and 2" from the outside edge of the perimeter binding. 
  2. Using the template that comes with the grommets, draw a circle in each corner. 
  3. Cut out the circles. If you have trouble closing your grommets, you can carefully peel away and then clip back the heavyweight interfacing from the cut edge of the circles. 
  4. Snap together the grommets.
    NOTE: If you are new to working with the Dritz® home curtain grommets, we have a full tutorial

Contributors

Project Design: Alicia Thommas
Sample Creation and Instructional Outline: Debbie Guild

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Comments (9)

Carrollina said:
Carrollina's picture

It’s truly a great and helpful piece of information. I’m happy that you simply shared this useful info with us. Please keep us informed like this. Thank you for sharing.

Betty Meyskens said:
Betty Meyskens's picture

Such a cool project - could be used for many things, not just sewing.  I have not been exposed to sewing with vinyl so this might be just the project to do.

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@ Betty - yes, it has many uses. With the right foot and machine, sewing with vinyl is a breeze.

annabanana said:
annabanana's picture

GREAT idea.  Don't know if I'm ready to tackle vinyl and thick layers and such, but this would be great for travel.  I live about a four-hour drive from my immediate family, and when I visit them on long weekends/holidays, I often take my sewing machine and a project with me.  It would be great to have the matching thread, tools, notions, etc. for a given project already gathered in the caddy, so that when I make a trip home, I wouldn't have to take time to gather and pack every little thing and worry if I forgot something.  Just grab my machine, the in-progress project/fabric, and the caddy!  In fact, if I ever get brave enough to try this and it turns out okay, I might make two - I rarely have just one project going at a time!  Thanks for the inspiration.

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@ annabanana - that sounds like a fabulous idea for this caddy. Hope you do it. The layers are not really too scary, the Janome S7 just made it super DUPER easy to stitch 

Christine G said:
Christine G's picture

I can't wait to start this.  I think I will be making one for my BBFas well.  Thanks for sharing.

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@ Christine - BBFs caddys - what a great idea. Let us know how they turn out. 

Theresa Turner said:
Theresa Turner's picture

What a handy organizational tool.  My little items like my clear 5" rulers, clips, seam rippers, marking pens seem to get lost.  This caddy will make them visible and handy.  The pocket on the back  for  current project instruction/pattern is definitely a plus. Thank you for this great project I know just the fabric I want to use.    

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@ Theresa - So glad you like it. Have fun with the project and let us know how it turns out for you. 

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