Fairfield-Project Foam at WalMart

Facebook Twitter Sew4Home RSS Feed Follow Me on Pinterest

Sew4Home

Round Patchwork Placemats with Straight Line Quilting

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

It's the age-old square peg in a round hole conundrum... or vice versa: round peg in square(ish) hole. Plates are round, but placemats are usually rectangles. Sure, you have that extra real estate off to the sides for your napkin and utensils, but circles do come in several dimensions. Our round placemats finish at 16" in diameter, giving you plenty of room for a variety of place settings. And they're reversible: patchwork on the front, solid on the back for twice the table topping power.

Our thanks for Fat Quarter Shop for sponsoring this project. We used two Fat Quarter Bundles to help make our set of four placemats: Fox Field Pony Play in Shade and Fox Field Botanica in Dusk, both from the Fox Field collection by Tula Pink for FreeSpirit Fabrics. There is a third, Sunrise colorway if you're a fan of gorgeous pinks, oranges and reds.

Each placemat uses a combination of five different designs from the collection (four on the front for the quarter-rounds and one for the back). They all mix-and-match beautifully, so there's no trouble coming up with an entire banquet table of options. We offer a wedge pattern below, so there's no stress about drawing a perfect circle. 

Tula Pink is a favorite here at Sew4Home. Her intricate designs have a wonderful, "look-again" quality to them. Look once, it's a playful jumbo polka dot, look again, there's a bunny hopping through the dots. Look once, it's a rich floral, look again, there's sweet bird and an elegant fox.

Each placemat finishes at 16", excluding the piping. 

Sewing Tools You Need

Fabric and Other Supplies

As mentioned above, we used Fat Quarters for our project. If you choose not to use pre-cuts, you'll need approximate 18" x 22" scraps or ⅓ yard cuts for the wedges and ½ yard cuts for the backs. These amounts allow extra yardage for fussy cutting, which for this pattern, is important to the final outcome. 

Each Placemat requires FIVE Fat Quarters (or yardage as noted above): four for the front and one for the back. If you are making a set, you could repeat some fabrics, as we did, for both continuity and best use of fabric. 

We used the following combinations in Fox Field by Tula Pink for FreeSpirit Fabrics from Fat Quarter Shop:

Placemat 1 (quadrants listed in clockwise order)

  • Vintage Stars in Shade
  • Hoppy Dot in Shade
  • Pointed Lace in Shade
  • Foxtrot in Shade
  • Back: Baby Geo in Shade

Placemat 2

  • Botanica in Shade
  • Pony Play in Shade
  • Vintage Stars in Shade
  • Hoppy Dot in Shade
  • Back: Scribbles in Shade

Placemat 3

  • Vintage Stars in Dusk
  • Hoppy Dot in Dusk
  • Pointed Lace in Dusk
  • Foxtrot in Dusk
  • Back: Baby Geo in Dusk

Placemat 4

  • Pony Play in Dusk
  • Botanica in Dusk
  • Vintage Stars in Dusk
  • Hoppy dot in Dusk
  • Back: Serpentine in Dusk

Each placemat also requires:

  • ½ yard of fusible fleece; we used Heat 'n' Bond Fusible Fleece by ThermoWeb 
  • 1⅝ yards of ¼" piping; we used pre-made jumbo piping in a soft blue-grey that coordinated with all our fabrics, purchased locally
    NOTE: You could certainly make your own piping. If you decide on this path, use ¼" piping cord and 1½" bias strips to equal a length of 55" per placemat. Check out our Piping Tutorial for more details. 
  • All purpose thread to match fabric
  • All purpose thread to match piping for straight line quilting
  • See-through ruler
  • Fabric pen or pencil
  • Seam gauge
  • Seam ripper
  • Scissors or rotary cutter and mat
  • Iron and ironing board
  • Straight pins
  • Hand sewing needle

Getting Started

  1. Download and print out our TWO pattern sheets: Quarter Section Part 1 (PRINT 2), Quarter Section Part 2 (PRINT 2).
    IMPORTANT: Each pattern is ONE 8½" x 11" sheet. You must print the PDF files at 100%. DO NOT SCALE to fit the page. There is a guide rule on each page so you can confirm your final printout is to scale.
  2. Cut out each pattern piece along the solid line. 
  3. Butt together (do not overlap) each pair along the solid center lines (marked with the double arrows). Tape together each to create two full wedge pattern pieces. Set one wedge aside. 
  4. From each of the front fabrics, use the wedge pattern to carefully fussy cut one piece. As we mentioned above, the fussy cutting is important to this design, not only to center a focal-point motif, but also to make sure your wedge is straight and true so the final straight-line quilting looks good.
  5. Once all four front wedges have been cut, find the second wedge pattern. Rotate the second wedge 90˚. At the center line where the two would join, trim away the seam allowance from one wedge.
  6. Overlap the trimmed wedge with the full wedge, aligning the dotted lines to maintain a perfectly straight match. Tape together to create a half circle. 
  7. Finally, trim away the seam allowance from the straight edge (what would be the inside edge of a full circle). The seam allowance now runs only around the outer curved edge. 
  8. Find the fabrics for each placemat back. Fold the fabric in half, being careful to keep the motif straight. Place the straight edge along the fold. Pin in place. Then cut around the outer curved edge to create the back circle of each placemat.
  9. Arrange each set of four wedges into a finished front circle
  10. This helps you keep track of the quadrants and insures the motifs are all going in the right direction.

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

  1. Place the upper right wedge right sides together with the bottom right wedge. Pin in place along the center seam.
  2. Repeat to pin the upper left wedge right sides together the bottom left wedge.
  3. Using a ½" seam allowance, stitch both pairs together.

    NOTE: As you can see in the photo above, we chain stitched our pairs. For more about this, as well as other quilting tips and tricks, take a look at our five-part Quilting Basics series, which starts here with Part 1.
  4. Place the two halves right sides together, carefully aligning the center seams. Also, be sure to "nest" your seams, which means one seam allowance should be pressed to the right and one to the left. Again, there are more notes about this and other patchworking steps in our Quilting Basics series. Pin in place.
  5. Open up the completed circle and press flat.
  6. Find the fusible fleece. Using your completed front circle as a pattern, cut out a circle of fleece.
  7. Following manufacturer's instructions, fuse the fleece to the wrong side of the front circle.
  8. Find the piping. Cut a 55" - 56" length for each placemat.
  9. Pin the piping around the entire outer perimeter of the placemat top, on the right side. The raw edges of the piping should be flush with the raw edge of the fabric. Your joint should be at a wedge seam. Remember to leave a piping head and tail free to join. 
  10. At the starting/ending point, use your seam ripper to reveal the cord. Cut the ends so they butt together at the seam. 
  11. Trim away the excess fabric if neeb be, then re-fold the fabric into place around the cording and re-pin.
  12. Machine baste the piping to the placemat top. We used a Satin Stitch foot on our Janome. You could also use a Zipper foot.

    NOTE: If you are new to attaching piping, check out our full Piping tutorial, which has great step-by-step notes on joining.
  13. Place each placemat front and back right sides together. Pin around the outer perimeter, leaving an approximate 3" - 4" opening for turning.
  14. Switch to a Zipper foot. Using a ½" seam allowance, stitch around the entire perimeter. Your seam allowance may be slightly wider or narrower; the goal is to stitch as close to the piping as possible. Go slowly and keep your seam allowance consistence. Remember to lock your seam at either side of the 3" - 4" opening. 
  15. At the opening, pull away the placemat back, revealing just the piping against the placemat front. Still using a Zipper foot, carefully stitch right along the piping cord across the width of the opening. By doing this short seam now, when you turn the placemat right side out, the piping will be completely flush around the front and you will only need to worry about closing the opening along the back. 
  16. Clip the curved edge all around, being very careful to not clip through your seam. Turn the placemat right side out through the opening and press flat.
  17. Fold back the raw edge of the placemat back at the opening so it is flush with the sewn seam. Lightly pin in place.
  18. Flip over the placemat. Using a see-through ruler and a fabric pen or pencil, draw guide lines for the straight line quilting. Start ¾" in from one side (inside the piping) and draw your first vertical line. Continue parallel lines at ¾" intervals across the entire front of the placemat. You are working on the right side of the fabric, so make sure you are using a fabric pen or pencil that will easily wipe or wash away or vanish with exposure to the air.
    NOTE: If you are working with a Walking foot and quilt bar, you only need to draw two lines. You can then set the quilting bar at the ¾" interval to create the remaining vertical lines.
  19. Re-thread the machine with the contrasting thread that matches the piping in the top and bobbin. 
  20. If possible, attach a Walking foot with quilt bar. Lengthen your stitch a bit.
  21. Stitch along each drawn line, simply following each line or by setting your quilt bar along the previous line of stitching.

    NOTE:
    If you are new to quilting, you may also want to review our guest tutorial by Modern Quilting Wonder, and S4H friend, Heather Jones on Straight Line Quilting. 
  22. Thread a hand needle and whip stitch closed the section of opening pinned down on the back of the placemat.

Contributors

Project Design: Alicia Thommas  
Sample Creation: Debbie Guild

Section: 

Comments (7)

sandie said:
sandie's picture

These placemats are great..I have not sewn with piping before.., This will be a great way to learn. The placemats will make great gifts as well. 

Nancy C said:
Nancy C's picture

Love these!  Plan to make them soon with fabric from my stash!

java diva said:
java diva's picture

Is piping optional? Could I use just bias binding? I have never sewn anything round before but I love these!

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@ java diva - you could do bias binding, but actually, I think you'd find the piping easier to work with in the round.

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@ java diva - you could do bias binding, but actually, I think you'd find the piping easier to work with in the round.

Faith Stanton said:
Faith Stanton's picture

These placemats are great.  I want to make a set right away.

DebS said:
DebS's picture

I love these placemats! One side could be formal, the other for everyday. Definitely going to make these as soon as I find colors that will match my dining room scheme

Add new comment

*Sew4Home reserves the right to restrict comments that don’t relate to the article, contain profanity, personal attacks or promote personal or other business.
By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.