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Tiny Tucks with a Quarter Inch Seam Foot

Tuesday, 03 May 2016 1:00

Narrow tucks, called pintucks when they are super-duper narrow, are most well-known in the world of heirloom sewing, but they can add a lovely bit of detail to many kinds of projects. You can create this look quickly and easily with your Quarter Inch Seam foot. Tucks can be sewn in thread to match the fabric for a classic tone-on-tone look. Switch to a contrasting thread for extra detail along the stitch line. Or, accent with decorative stitching between tucks on directly on top of each tuck.

How to Sew An X Box to Secure Straps & More

Wednesday, 30 March 2016 1:00

You can't play Sonic Generations with this type of "X Box," but you can use it in your sewing projects to secure all types of straps and narrow panels. It's simply a stitched box with an "X" through the middle. This stitching pattern provides a high level of strength and stability, and when done with precision, it also adds a pretty detail. Try it with a contrasting thread color for extra emphasis. In the industrial world of strapping, the X Box is often at the heart of rigging, where it's meant to hold extreme loads, such as in a parachute harness. You'd want to research online to learn how to create this unique specialty stitch. Here at Sew4Home, we're using it in a decorative fashion to help hold an apron strap in place or a handle on a bag. So while a tight bond is certainly achieved, the most demanding function of the home sewing X Box is to look smooth and even. 

How to Insert a Rectangular Base into a Tube

Wednesday, 23 March 2016 1:00

Sewing a rectangle into a tube rings of “square peg in a round hole” hopelessness. And yet, it’s one of the most common techniques when creating bags, boxes, and baskets. If you want a flat, stable base, an inset base panel is the go-to option. To make this geometric magic happen doesn’t take a hammer, but it does require careful measuring and marking upfront, and sewing each side independently during construction. Follow our easy steps to achieve an expert finish.

How to Sew On a Button by Hand

Wednesday, 16 March 2016 1:00

Picking out buttons for your sewing projects is fun! But, let's be frank... sewing on those buttons is not quite as fun. It's kind of the "cleaning toilets" of the sewing world – a dirty job, but one that is very worth it in the end. The up-side of button sewing is that it's relatively quick and easy, and there's no sponge involved. Our button sewing tutorial explains the basics.

Quick Tip: Topstitching versus Edgestitching

Wednesday, 09 March 2016 1:00

As a writer and editor, I’m a bit of a “word geek.” I love all the crazy intricacies, like the subtle but important difference between further and farther, fewer and less or lie and lay. Yes, I am one of those annoying people… and a devastating opponent in Scrabble. There are a couple terms in sewing that get tossed about interchangeably: topstitching and edgestitching. They are similar but different animals, each with its own distinct purposes. The images above of our Five-Pocket Canvas Bag feature a variety of beautiful and precise topstitching and edgestitching.

How to Cut Large Fabric Panels in One Fell Swoop

Wednesday, 02 March 2016 1:00

There are a lot of home décor projects that require cutting large panels of fabrics, such as curtains, throws, and tablecloths. When you're short on space, this can be a bit of a challenge. So here's a little folding-and-cutting trick to make it easier, faster, more compact ... and actually, more precise. Remember making paper snowflakes as a kid? You fold, fold, fold, and then cut, cut, cut. Same basic concept, but without the swiss cheese effect. Grab your rotary cutter and mat and let's slice!

Quick Tip: How Tapered Corners Make Square Pillows

Tuesday, 23 February 2016 1:00

The square pillow – it's a decorating staple and a great way to freshen up a room. You pick your favorite fabric, measure carefully, and cut two perfect squares. You sew the seams, pivoting at each corner with precision, and insert the pillow form. You set the finished pillow on the sofa, and... Hey! That pillow doesn't look square! Instead of crisp straight edges, the sides curve in toward the center and the corners are floppy. Use this quick tip to learn how a slight curve can create a better square.

How to Attach Metal Rivets to Sewing Projects

Friday, 19 February 2016 1:00

Rivets are everywhere. Airliners have rivets. The pockets of your Levis® have rivets. Frogs make the sound, "rrriiiiiivvvet." That last example probably isn't applicable, but it kinda makes you wonder, doesn't it? Not only are rivets ubiquitous, they look super professional when used on a sewing project. Rivets also have a very logical purpose: they hold lots of thick layers together at points where it would be impossible to stitch with a sewing machine.

Turning and Pressing Skinny Straps & Ties

Thursday, 11 February 2016 1:00

Do you ever watch those TV hospital shows and think, "I could do that"? Maybe not be an actual, real-life doctor. But you could wear a white coat, carry a stethoscope, and yell, "Get me a C-Spine, Chem 7, and a V-Fib!" I have no idea what any of those terms mean. They're just fun to shout. To get you just a little bit closer to your doctor daydreams, we're here to show you how one of the medical devices you saw Dr. Greene use every week can also be a big help in your sewing room. It's called a hemostat, and it's basically a locking clamp shaped like a long pair of scissors. (Probably what Dr. Greene wanted when he yelled, "Clamp!") A hemostat is extremely useful when you need to turn long, narrow tubes right side out.

Sewing Misdemeanors: 20 Things We All Do But Shouldn't

Wednesday, 10 February 2016 1:00

The sewing police aren't going to haul you away for these minor infractions, but they are the little things we all try to get away with when we think no one is looking. Kind of like convincing yourself chocolate is part of the dairy food group. But if you want the very best results, kicking your bad habits to the curb is important. Which of these are you guilty of? What other ones would you add?

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